Email Mr. McHugh at: mchughc@nasdschools.org


May 15 & 16 A.M. Alg. Keystone Proctor 1st period 7:24 - 9:48, 2nd until 10:35, No 3rd or 4th

May 1, Monday
  1. Return and cover CH 13 Test *Make your corrections as needed to help yourself later
  2. Cover Round 1 of Balancing Equations worksheet
  3. Practice balancing chemical equations together "Balancing Chemical Equations" (Round 2) *Refer to the steps from your notes if needed
Homework: "Chemical Equations" Reinforcement and Study Guide

April 28, Friday
  1. Work with 1 partner to complete the Schoology activity "Balancing Chemical Equations" on PhET
  2. Begin work on "Balancing Chemical Equations" (Round 1)
Homework: "Balancing Chemical Equations" (Round 1) worksheet

April 27, Thursday
  1. Check and cover homework
  2. Check on pennies from the Explore Activity from last time (show trays to whole group; unwrap a few)
  3. View in order:
    1. Cleaning Pennies Explanation (1:00)
    2. Why did some of our pennies turn green? (2:00)
    3. "Turning copper into sliver and then into gold" (3:00)
  4. Covered CH 16 Notes slides 8-12
  5. Intro to Balancing Chemical Equations: Science Classroom Balancing Chemical Equations (9:00)

April 26, Wednesday (Out for P.M. training at Colonial I.U.)
  1. Reminder: Don't forget to finish EDPuzzle activities from last time
  2. Complete work on the Balancing Chemical Equations gizmo on explorelearning.com (group max. of 2)
Homework: Coordinate finishing the gizmo with your partner if necessary

April 25, Tuesday
  1. Project and Demo Steps 1 & 2 of the Explore Activity (pg. 441)
  2. Covered CH 16 Notes slides 1-8
  3. Time Permitting: View short videos Props & Changes (3:00) & Iron and Sulfur
  4. Project and Demo Steps 3 - 6 of the Explore Activity (pg. 441)
Homework: "Chemical Changes in Matter" Reinforcement and Study Guide

April 24, Monday (Out for Training at Liberty, then Colonial I.U.)
Please have laptops and earbuds out and ready to go
EDPuzzle on: Tyler DeWitt Balancing Chemical Equations (15:00), Bozeman Beginner's Guide to Balancing (11:00), and TED on Conservation of Mass (4:30)
*Note: You should be able to view the video and answer questions as many times as you wish. However, if you decide to go back and improve your score later, you will need to email me a screenshot so I can update your grade in Sapphire. If you're focused, you should be able to earn a 100% the first time.
Homework: Finish (or improve) on EDPuzzles from today

April 21, Friday (Gather materials for upcoming lab)
CH 13 Test Today; important info on front board

April 20, Thursday
CH 13 Test Tomorrow!
Today:
  1. Check and display homework key
  2. CH 13 Extra Credit Crossword Review
  3. CH 13 Kahoot Review

April 19, Wednesday
  1. CH 13 Test Friday; Begin to study now!
  2. "Biological Compounds" Reinforcement and Study Guide
  3. Schoology Activity: From the Measurable to the Miniscule

April 18, Tuesday
  1. Schoology Activity: From the Measurable to the Miniscule
  2. Check Sapphire and get caught up on any "n" incomplete assignments

April 13, Thursday
Important Update: I will be out for training during the morning for the first few days after Easter break. However, I expect you to use class time to complete one additional assignment for chapter 13, and to review and take the test for that chapter during that time. More details will follow both here and on Schoology in the coming days.
  1. Collect any remaining Building DNA gizmos
  2. DNA K'nex activity:
    1. Use the manual to identify the pieces
    2. Take the time to complete and show me as many of the activities as possible
  3. Time Permitting: Viewed Molecules of Life(11:00)
Homework:

April 12, Wednesday
Important Update: I will be out for training during the morning for the first few days after Easter break. However, I expect you to use class time to complete one additional assignment for chapter 13, and to review and take the test for that chapter during that time. More details will follow both here and on Schoology in the coming days.
  1. Check and cover homework
  2. Building DNA Gizmo
  3. Reminder: Scores for EDPuzzle will be entered soon. Make sure to complete any video questions you haven't done yet.
Homework: Finish Building DNA Gizmo

April 11, Tuesday
  1. Reminder: Scores for yesterday's EDPuzzle will be entered soon. Don't worry about re-dos. Just make sure to complete any video questions you haven't done yet. If there were technical difficulties that affected your score, tell me, or shoot me an email, and I can reset that video quiz for you.
  2. Check and cover Carbs and Lipids Coloring Sheet
  3. Covered CH 13 Notes on "Proteins and Nucleic Acids" slide 36 thru 51
  4. Answer Questions for Bozeman Proteins (9:00) and Nucleic Acids (7:00)
Homework: Proteins and Nucleic Acids coloring diagrams / questions and video questions (if not done in class)

April 10, Monday
  1. Please have laptops and earbuds out and ready to go
  2. Check and cover homework
  3. EDPuzzle for Bozeman Carbohydrates (9:00) and Lipids (7:00) and Crash Course Biological Molecules (14:00) *Note: You should be able to view the video and answer questions as many times as you wish. However, if you decide to go back and improve your score later, you will need to email me a screenshot so I can update your grade in Sapphire. If you're focused, you should be able to earn a 100% the first time.
  4. Reminder: Don't forget to finish / turn in Dehydration Synthesis Gizmo if you still need to
Homework: Finish EDPuzzle activities from today

April 7, Friday (Quick Update on me being out in the near future)
  1. Collect any remaining Dehydration Synthesis gizmo worksheets. Anyone who wasn't here to get one?
  2. Check and display Monomer / Polymer "Making Connections" worksheet
  3. CH 13 Notes "Carbohydrates and Lipids" thru slide 35
  4. Just how much energy could be stored in a carbohydrate-rich, yet oh so delicious, gummy bear you ask? a b
Homework: Carbohydrates and Lipids coloring diagrams and questions

April 6, Thursday
  1. Complete work on the Dehydration Synthesis gizmo on explorelearning.com (group max. of 2)
Homework:
  1. Coordinate finishing the gizmo with your partner if necessary
  2. Use Internet to answer Monomer / Polymer "Making Connections" worksheet questions (2 sides)


April 5, Wednesday
  1. Here is another great short video on monomers and polymers
  2. Hands-on Activity: Macromolecule Models
    1. Briefly read lab sheet and answer pre-lab questions together
    2. Demonstrate lab materials and procedure
    3. Complete activity in groups of 2
    4. Please don't forget to take apart models when finished
  3. Use Internet to answer Monomer / Polymer "Making Connections" worksheet questions (2 sides)

April 4, Tuesday
  1. Check and cover "Simple Organic Compounds" homework
  2. Cover CH 13 Notes on monomers and polymers thru slide 22
  3. Answer questions from: Monomers vs. Polymers Video (5:00)
  4. Begin Monomer / Polymer paperclip activity *Please don't forget to take apart models when finished
Homework: Use the Internet to answer any remaining questions from this activity

April 3, Monday:
  1. CH 13 Notes thru slide 15
  2. View and answer questions from: Why Carbon is a Tramp (14:00) and Hydrocarbons (1st 5 minutes)
Homework: Complete the "Simple Organic Compounds" Reinforcement and Study Guide

March 31, Friday
CH 11 Quiz Today. Pertinent info on front board

March 30, Thursday
  1. CH 11 Quiz Tomorrow
  2. Check and cover homework
  3. CH 11 Kahoot Review
  4. Extra Credit Review Puzzle (due at the beginning of class tomorrow)
Homework: Study for Tomorrow!!!

March 29, Wednesday
  1. CH 11 Quiz Friday
  2. Briefly read and discuss DHMO article (as a class)
  3. Finish and turn in Oxidation Number Puzzles. *If you're still having trouble with this you should watch these at some point:
      1. Tyler DeWitt "Writing Ionic Formulas" (12:00)
      2. Naming Ionic Compounds with Transition Metals (10:00)
      3. Writing Formulas with Polyatomic Ions (11:20)
  4. Begin work on 11-4 Reinforcement Sheet "Formulas and Names" Reinforcement and Study Guide
Homework: Finish 11-4 worksheet

March 28, Tuesday
  1. CH 11 Quiz Friday
  2. Handout Oxidation Numbers Sheets and blank printer paper
  3. Practice with writing formulas and compound names
  4. Ionic Bonding Puzzles on board (dry-erase magnets)
Homework: Finish Chemical Naming and Formula Writing (View short videos for tomorrow above if you're having trouble with this)

March 27, Monday
  1. Return and cover CH 10 Test
  2. Viewed: TED How polarity makes water behave strangely (4:00) (and this could accompany water properties coloring diagram)
  3. Handout Oxidation Numbers Sheets
  4. Practice writing Chemical Naming and Formula Writing

March 24, Friday
  1. Check and cover homework
  2. Viewed: What are Polyatomic Ions? (5:00) Check this out if you want a more detailed explanation.
  3. Login to our course on Schoology and play the Ionic Bonding Game *Note: You can play as many times as you like, but make sure you either show me in person, or otherwise send me a screen shot of your highest score to be entered into Sapphire
  4. Use any remaining time to check Sapphire and finish any "n" (incomplete) assignments.
Homework:

March 23, Thursday
  1. Collect any remaining gizmos
  2. Viewed the following:
    1. TED How atoms bond (3:00)
    2. Sci Show: Why do atoms bond? (2:00)
  3. Finish CH 11 Notes
Homework: Kinds of Chemical Bonds Reinforcement and Study Guide

March 22, Wednesday
CH 10 Test Makeups
  1. Complete work on the Covalent Bond Gizmo (*Note: You may need to login to access the worksheets.) *Note: this assignment will be graded on both completion and accuracy)
  2. Finish EDPuzzle video assignments if you still need to.
Homework: Finish Gizmos and EDPuzzle assignments

March 21, Tuesday
*Check homework and display key
Period 4: Complete work on the Ionic Bond Gizmo (*Note: this assignment will be graded on both completion and accuracy)
Homework: Login to EDPuzzle.com (Click Student, Google, and enter your normal school username/password) and complete the video assignments on bonding
Period 6:
Grab a laptop and headphones if you need them on the way in today
Go to EDPuzzle.com, click "Student," "Google" and login using your school login info
For Today: Please complete the EDPuzzle assignments: Ionic Bonding Parts 1-3 and Atomic Hook Ups (34:00+ total)
Homework: Finish the EDPuzzle video questions if you didn't finish during class today

March 20, Monday
3rd Marking Period ends at the end of next week. Now would be a great time to login to Sapphire when you have a chance, identify and complete any "n" (incomplete) assignments and turn them in or let me know that you've done so if they are online assignments. Please also consider completing extra credit assignments (always available on Schoology) if you really need to. *Finally, please be aware that by the end of 3rd marking period, your overall grade for the course (year) is beginning to take shape. If you are struggling, there is still time to take the appropriate action... but not much time.
Begin CH 11 Notes on Chemical Bonding (thru Getting Their Fill)
I want to check for credit and go over by the end of class today: Why Atoms Combine Reinforcement and Study Guide sheet for credit (use notes from today and purple phys sci textbook)
CH 11 Notes

March 13, Monday
CH 10 Test Makeups
Main Question for Today: What makes an atom stable (unreactive) vs. unstable (reactive)?
Viewed Tyler DeWitt Valence electrons and the Periodic Table (16:00) *Question sheets collected for credit
Introduced the Periodicity Worksheet page 1& 2 on overhead.
Homework: Answer questions on the back of Periodicity Worksheet

March 10, Friday
CH 10 Test Today
Important Info on Front Board

March 9, Thursday
CH 10 Test Tomorrow
Check and display CH 10 Review Problems Key
Today Chapter 10 Kahoot
Homework: STUDY everything you have dealing with atoms and the periodic table: Notes, Vocab, Worksheets, Chemical Symbols of Elements, Complete Chemical Symbols, etc.

March 8, Wednesday
CH 10 Test Friday (Prepare for short answer questions on atomic structure, explaining various sections of the periodic table, and calculating the average atomic mass for a particular element)
Tomorrow we will run the Chapter 10 Kahoot review in class. *At this point we need to be thinking "Big Picture," since 3rd marking period is over soon, and only 4th quarter and the final exam will remain.
For Today:
  1. Check and cover Nuclear Atom
  2. Viewed Nucleus: Crash Course Chem #1 (10:00)
  3. Begin work on CH 10 Review Problems
  4. CH 10 Extra Credit Review Puzzle
Homework: CH 10 Review Problems

CH 10
Higgs-Boson Cartoon (7:00) *optional
Alkali Metals (30:00)
Alkaline Earth Metals (5:00)
Metalloids (7:00)
Nonmetals (6:00)
Halogens (27:00)
Noble Gases (32:00)
Lanthanides (4:30)
Actinides (5:20)

March 7, Tuesday
CH 10 Test Friday
  1. Any remaining periodic table presentations? Were any sections missed? (If so, view short clips above)
  2. Collect presentation sheet
  3. Revisiting how to calculate the average atomic mass of an element using Carbon isotopes as an example
  4. Viewed Carbon Dating with Carbon Isotopes (2:00) How Carbon and other Dating Works (4:00)
  5. Introduced and began work on the Nuclear Atom worksheets
Extra Time? Viewed short video clips of periodic table sections (above)
Homework: Nuclear Atom Sheet

March 6, Monday
Element Group Project Presentations will begin today. Just a few important points before we begin:
  1. Your grade for this project is based upon the quality of your presentation and the professionalism you demonstrate both while presenting to the class and while being a respectful member of the audience. Am I saying that you will lose points on your grade if you act unprofessional? Yes.
  2. If you are not presenting, it is your job to pay attention to the speakers and to complete this sheet for credit
  3. Make sure you bring this worksheet to class until we are finished with this section of material

March 3, Friday
Element Group Project Presentations will begin today. Just a few important points before we begin:
  1. Are there groups who NEED to go today (ex: you know a group member will be absent Monday) OR who NEED to go Monday (ex: someone is absent today)
  2. Your grade for this project is based upon the quality of your presentation and the professionalism you demonstrate both while presenting to the class and while being a respectful member of the audience. Am I saying that you will lose points on your grade if you act unprofessional? Yes.
  3. If you are not presenting, it is your job to pay attention to the speakers and to complete this sheet for credit
  4. Make sure you bring this worksheet to class until we are finished with this section of material

March 2, Thursday
Element Group Project Presentations will occur tomorrow and Monday
Review Project Directions and Grading Criteria (below) as well as important points for tomorrow
For Today:
  • Complete and finishing touches for your project
    • Ideas for going above and beyond
  • If you want, ask me to look over the project with your group
  • Rehearse the project with your group (who will be responsible for which part?)
    • A bit of advice: It's always best to explain what is shown on screen, rather than to simply read it word-for-word
  • If you finish early, try the bonus puzzle (available up front)
Homework: Coordinate finishing and rehearsing the presentation with your partner(s)

March 1, Wednesday
Element Group Project Presentations will occur Thursday and Friday
Review Project Directions and Grading Criteria (below)
Continue work on your project
Important Points:
  • The goal is approximately 10-12 slides (5-10 min)
  • 2 major focus points:
    • Characteristics of whole group/section
    • Interesting facts and common uses of specific elements in your section
  • The block on the periodic table is different than a complete chemical symbol for 1 atom of an element
  • You may use 1 video clip (less than 60 seconds)
  • Focus on major grading criteria first, then go above and beyond
Homework: Coordinate finishing and rehearsing the presentation with your partner(s)

Feb 28, Tuesday
Continued work on Element Group Project (due date Friday March 3rd)
Review Project Directions (below)
Important Points:
  • Review sample presentation and Periodic Trends graph
  • The goal is approximately 10-12 slides (5-10 min)
  • If you haven't yet done so, share the presentation to me and your partner(s)
  • Use textbooks and reliable Internet sources
  • Focus on hitting each of the grading criteria, but for maximum credit put some time and effort into accuracy, creativity, and going the extra mile
Homework: Coordinate finishing and rehearsing the presentation with your partner(s)

Feb 27, Monday
Group Periodic Table (Group) project work and presentation (Groups of 2 or 3 maximum) *Due date: Projects will be presented Friday March 3rd and Monday March 6th, however most of the project work should be able to be completed in class today through Thursday. If you think that you will require more than 4 class periods to create a nice short, Google Drive Powerpoint, make sure to coordinate the completion this project with your partner(s) outside of class time. *Choose partners carefully and share the work equally, or decide to work solo from the start. You may not change groups after day 2 of working and no matter what, the project due date will not change.
Grading Criteria Checklist:
  • The presentation is creative (Overall layout, images, text are visually appealing)
  • The presentation includes several effective supporting images.
  • The presentation effectively summarizes the group characteristics (for your particular group of elements)
    • 1 image must show or highlight where your group lies on the periodic table
    • 1 image must be an atomic model/diagram of an atom of one of your elements
    • 1 image must be a complete chemical symbol of an atom of one of your elements
      Complete_Chemical_Symbol.png
  • The presentation includes info on specific elements within your group (as well as common uses and interesting facts)
  • The presentation shows the various isotopes of at least one of your elements along with the calculation showing how to solve for the average atomic mass of that element
  • The name of the person responsible for creating each slide is included in the title or elsewhere on each slide and that person presents them to the class
  • The information (text, images, video etc.) is(are) accurate, clearly visible, and concise (Include a sufficient amount of quality material in en effective manner without drowning the viewer in paragraph after paragraph of text on the screen)
  • Presentation includes a "Works Cited" slide listing the sources used
  • The speaker(s) speak loudly and clearly enough to be heard and understood
  • The presenter(s) spend a portion of the time explaining their slides while facing the audience as opposed to reading all slides while facing the screen
How do I begin?
  1. Decide who you will work with and which group of elements you want to focus on. If there are conflicts, we'll draw to determine who gets a particular group to work with. (Possible choices include: Alkali Metals, Alkaline Earth Metals, Transition Metals, Poor Metals, Metalloids (a.k.a. semi-metals), Nonmetals, Halogens, Noble gases, Lanthanides, and Actinides) We will work in groups small enough to cover each group of elements and obviously each group of elements can only be used once.
  2. Once topics are assigned, login onto a laptop and sign into your school Gmail account.
  3. Create a new Presentation, Share it with each group member using his or her school emails and myself mchughc@nasdschools.org
  4. Begin working on the project. *Note: there will be some class time to work on the project between now and the due date, but you may need to spend some time outside of class completing the project if your group needs additional time.

Feb 24, Friday
Checked and covered homework
For today: try this out!:
  1. Review the section titled "What's in the Box?"
  2. Click Play with "Which one of these elements doesn't belong?" (Correct answers give you 1 point; let me know once you earn a score /10 you want)
  3. Review the section titled "Isotopes"
  4. Click Play "Isotope Quiz" (Here you will need a pen and paper; Practice these calculations until you get a few of the elements correct and then turn in your paper SHOWING YOUR WORK for credit. Here is a 3 minute review of how to do these types of calculations.)
  5. If you were absent today, you may either do this when you return OR send me a screenshot of your score.

Feb 23, Thursday
Column 3 Element Quiz Today
The "Stretched Out" Periodic Table AND why certain elements have whole number average atomic masses in parentheses:
  • "If the atomic mass of a particular element is shown in parentheses, such as (145) for Promethium (Pm), the atomic mass reflects that of the most stable isotope."
Powerpoint on and students completed the Blank Periodic Table Sheet
Time Permitting: Begin work on the Nuclear Atom Sheet
Homework: CH 10 "Periodic Table" Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow (You do not need to do word find portion)

Feb 22, Wednesday
Column 3 Element Quiz Tomorrow!
Check and cover homework
Multiple Power point reviews of column 3 from the "Elements to Know"
Viewed Brain Pop Cartoon "Periodic Table" (4:41)
Finished the CH 10 Notes. (10 slides)
TED Solving the Puzzle of the Periodic Table (4:30)
Extra Time? Practice with complete chemical symbols
Homework: Study for Column 3 Element Quiz Tomorrow

Feb 21, Tuesday
Have a calculator handy in class today
Element Column 3 Quiz Thursday
Multiple Power point reviews of column 3 from the "Elements to Know"
Viewed Brain Pop Cartoon "Isotopes" (4:00)
Dry Erase Board Review of complete chemical symbols, counting atoms, etc.:
  1. Practice with counting atoms (Random Student Selection any #1-40)
  2. Complete chemical symbols of neutral atoms, isotopes, ions, etc.
Average Atomic Mass Lab. (Completed Lab Sheets due Tomorrow)
  1. Gather your m&ms and complete the front (as a class)
  2. Answer the questions (solo or with a neighbor)
  3. Please Note: #7, 8, and 9 on back are designed to make you think, discuss, calculate, etc.
NOTE: If you are having trouble answering all questions, read the info presented here)
Homework:
  1. Finish today's activity worksheet
  2. Study for Column 3 Element Quiz Thursday

Feb 16, Thursday
Column 2 Element Quiz Today
Checked and covered 3-3 homework sheet
Multiple Power point reviews of column 3 from the "Elements to Know"
View Average Atomic Mass (13:00) *Question sheet collected for credit
Viewed the Quantum World Song
Periodic Table Song (3:00)
Homework:

Feb 15, Wednesday
Column 2 Element Quiz Next Time!
Multiple Power point reviews of column 2 from the "Elements to Know"
Continued CH 10 Notes thru slide 30
Viewed Eureka cartoon on electrons.
Introduced 3-3 worksheet on complete chemical symbols.
Homework: Study for Quiz and complete 3-3 worksheet for next time
Below is the complete chemical symbol for a 1+ Sodium Ion
Complete_Chemical_Symbol.png

Feb 14, Tuesday (Period 4 get caught up with this assignment. Period 6 Finish yesterday's assignment; then study hall)
Schoology Activities: Atomic Structure and Levels of Organization. *Note: These will be automatically graded and entered into Sapphire. Please take the time to get all questions correct considering that this is a relatively easy opportunity to earn a high grade for 3rd marking period.
*Make sure to click "Submit" when done or your answers will not be sent!
Homework: Finish both of these Schoology activities

Feb 13, Monday (Period 6 Only)
Schoology Activities: Atomic Structure and Levels of Organization. *Note: These will be automatically graded and entered into Sapphire. Please take the time to get all questions correct considering that this is a relatively easy opportunity to earn a high grade for 3rd marking period.
*Make sure to click "Submit" when done or your answers will not be sent!
Homework: Finish both of these Schoology activities

Feb 10, Friday
Please grab a laptop on the way to your seat today
Column 2 Element Quiz Tuesday
Multiple Power point reviews of column 2 from the "Elements to Know"
2nd 1/2 sheet Practice with counting atoms and/or (Random Student Selection any #1-40)
For today: try this out!
  1. Open our course on Schoology and click on the "Name that Atom" assignment
  2. Read the first few pages on "Atomic Basics"
  3. Click Play with "Name that Atom." (Correct answers give you 1 point, incorrect answers subtract 1 point)
  4. For this activity, you will receive a score based out of 12. You may continue for as long as you like. When finished, call me over or bring your laptop to me to receive your score. If you were absent today, you may either do this when you return OR send me a screenshot of your score.
  5. When finished, work through the next section titled "It's Elementary" or finish the Element Builder Gizmo on explorelearning.com if you still need to do that.
Homework: Continue to study for the element chemical symbol quizzes

Feb 8, Wednesday
Column 1 Element & Symbol Quiz today!
When finished, begin work on the Element Builder Gizmo (Please write answers on answer sheet only)
Homework: Finish the Gizmo

Feb 7, Tuesday
*Column 1 Element & Symbol Quiz Tomorrow; Column 1 element Power point review (time permitting)
  1. Checked and covered the "Counting Atoms" homework
  2. A few more examples for practice (Random Student Selection any #1-40)
  3. Viewed streaming videos here on: Simple Science (Atoms), a Better Model? (1:37) also Video: Quarks inside the Atom (3:00) and Video: The Space between Atoms (1:15)
  4. Column 1 chemical symbol review
  5. Handout Structure of the Atom Coloring activity (Read and color the sheet according to the directions)

Feb 6, Monday
Handed out 3-column list of "Elements to Know" and Periodic Table. Column 1 Element & Symbol Quiz on Wednesday.
Brain Pop Cartoon "Atoms" (2:45) and "Atomic Model" (4:09)
Covered CH 10 Notes thru slide 12
Teach "Counting Atoms" (7:00) (*Show connection to chemical formulas and examples with models: Combustion of Methane and
Column 1 element Power point review (time permitting)
Extra Time? Why Counting Atoms is Important in Chemistry (10:00)
Homework: Counting Atoms Practice due tomorrow. If the concept of "counting atoms" is confusing to you, try studying molecular and structural diagrams such as this one
Chemical_Formulas.png
Chemical_Formulas.png


Feb 3, Friday
Brief teacher demo, then students perform the "Reaction in a Bag" Lab Activity
  1. Brief review: physical vs. chemical properties and changes
  2. Safety Concerns:
    1. Calcium Chloride: Harmful if swallowed. Irritant. Contact may cause eye injury and skin irritation.
    2. Phenol Red: May be harmful if swallowed or absorbed through skin
  3. Read, and follow directions carefully. Absolutely no horseplay, and goggles must be worn at all times during this lab.
  4. Review Calcium Chloride MSDS on screen
  5. Introduce and begin lab sheet answering the first few questions together on screen
  6. Tip: after adding the dry white powder ingredients to the bottom corner of the bag, roll it up a bit to prevent the phenol red & water from coming into contact with them before you have a chance to remove most of the air from the bag
Review / Discuss lab questions and look at the balanced chemical reaction
Viewed 10 Most Amazing Chemical Reactions

Feb 2, Thursday (It's Groundhog Day!)
Display this info on front board:
CH 9 Test Today!
Collect any extra credit crossword review puzzles
When finished, please turn in test up front, and work on hidden message puzzle or something quietly, or read, etc. until everyone has had a chance to finish. Thank you.
Homework:

Feb 1, Wednesday
Schedule Solubility Quiz Makeups
Checked and covered CH 9 Study Guide
CH 9 Kahoot! Review
CH 9 Extra Credit Crossword Review Offered (due Tomorrow)
CH 9 Test Tomorrow
Homework:

Jan 31, Tuesday
Solubility Quiz Today
CH 9 Test Thursday
Handout Extra Credit Review Puzzle along with quiz
If you finish early, begin work on the CH 9 Study Guide and/or extra credit review puzzle
Homework: CH 9 Study Guide (due tomorrow)

Jan 30, Monday
Solubility Quiz Tomorrow
CH 9 Test Thursday
Use class time today to:
  1. See myself or a knowledgable friend if you have questions on solubility graphing for the quiz
  2. Begin work on the CH 9 Study Guide *this is due Wednesday
  3. Finish up any incomplete assignments (i.e. Chem4kids, Flowchart on Google Docs, etc.)
Homework: CH 9 Study Guide (due Wednesday)

Jan 27, Friday
Solubility Quiz Monday! (Be able to graph solubility data, and interpret the graph)
Finish Solubility Graphing (as needed)
Then Viewed "Classification of Matter" *Question sheets will be collected for credit
Extra Practice (Classification of Matter Online Quiz)

Jan 26, Thursday
Solubility Quiz Monday (Be able to graph solubility data, and interpret the graph)
Use class time today to practice set up, and graph the data for An Investigation in Solubility 2
Try to answer the worksheet questions using the graph
Go over questions as a group
If you have additional questions after class, check out this video which reviews my presentation today.
Homework:
S11.C.1.1.6 Describe factors that influence the frequency of collisions during chemical reactions that might affect the reaction rates (e.g., surface area, concentration, catalyst, temperature).
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

Jan 25, Wednesday
Solubility Quiz Monday (Be able to graph solubility data, and interpret the graph. *We will be learning this now)
Recap from yesterday's lab demo of "Rate of Dissolving" and "Solubility and Temperature"
Video demo: Solubility of Gas in Grape Soda
Introduce solubility graphs and lead the class through graphing the data for An Investigation in Solubility 1
Answer questions together.
If you have additional questions after class, check out this video which reviews my presentation today.
Homework: Finish Investigation in Solubility Graph and Questions
S11.C.1.1.6 Describe factors that influence the frequency of collisions during chemical reactions that might affect the reaction rates (e.g., surface area, concentration, catalyst, temperature).
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

Jan 24, Tuesday
Checked and covered homework
Having trouble with the new chapter? Extra Practice (online quiz; this activity is completely optional)
Viewed:
  1. Laser Light passing thru sink water (a solution of H2O and minerals, chlorine, etc.) vs. Laser Light passing through milk & water
  2. Video section on Solubility of Copper Sulfate in cold vs. hot water (8:30 - 13:30)
Solubility and rate of solution demos with digital balance, magnetic stirrer, and temperature probe:
  1. Rate of dissolving sugar cube vs. an equal mass of sugar crystals"
  2. Solubility of equal amounts of sugar in cool vs. hot water
Explanation:
  1. Overheads:
    1. What is the total surface area of 1 long 10 mL block
    2. What is the total surface area of the same block cut up into 10 pieces of equal volume?
Homework:
S11.C.1.1.6 Describe factors that influence the frequency of collisions during chemical reactions that might affect the reaction rates (e.g., surface area, concentration, catalyst, temperature).
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

Jan 23, Monday
*Reminder: Chem4kids Schoology quiz activity
  1. Review the concept map worksheet on the back of the CH 9 Notes *Write in key questions
  2. Introduced and began Classification of Matter Samples worksheet as a class. (For each section, there are specific questions to ask about each sample)
  3. Display online quiz on these concepts
Homework: CH 9 "Composition of Matter" Reinforcement and Study Guide and any other unfinished assignments
S11.A.3.3 Compare and analyze repeated processes or recurring elements in patterns.
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

Jan 20, Friday (Dept. Meeting 1st Period)
Begin work on Classification of matter flowchart activity (pairs or solo)
  1. Login to our course on Schoology

  2. Open the "Classification of Matter" Drawing. Click: "Make a Copy," "Rename" this file as (YourLastNameAssignmentTitle) and "Share" back to mchughc@nasdschools.org as a "Collaborator."

Complete the activity by:

    1. Correctly placing the tags in their respective locations
    2. Inserting at least 1 small & clearly visible image example for each of the bottom classes of matter (6 total)
    3. Insert a caption for each image (if it is not obvious what the image is showing) For example, it may not be obvious to the viewer that your small image is showing a block of iron whereas a different image clearly shows a bag of chex mix.

      *Note: the entire map must be clear and visible. Your changes should be saved automatically, but you will want to make sure your final changes are saved at the end, and that you have shared the drawing to me as a "Collaborator."

Homework: Complete the CH 9 Concept Map (on back of notes page 3)

S11.A.3.3 Compare and analyze repeated processes or recurring elements in patterns.
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

Jan 19, Thursday
Collected any Mixtures and Compounds Extra Credit coloring worksheets
Students completed the Mixture Separation Lab.
Mixture Separation Lab:
  1. Display Classification of Matter Flowchart slide on screen
  2. Read introduction as a group
  3. Safety concerns: Handle glassware and materials carefully.
  4. Read and follow directions carefully. (When in doubt, ask)
  5. Please leave lab station the way you found it. (Clean, dry, organized)
  6. Teacher identification of materials and recovery station.
  7. Make sure your beakers are clean and dry before beginning each part of the lab
Homework:
S11.A.3.3 Compare and analyze repeated processes or recurring elements in patterns.
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

Jan 18, Wednesday
Returned and covered the CH 8 Test
Handed out remaining CH 9 Notes and finished slides on"mixtures" and "pure substances."
Brain Pop Cartoon "Compounds and Mixtures" (2:00)
Viewed streaming video "Mixtures and Solutions" (17:00)
Students began the Compounds and Mixtures Coloring activity:
  1. Short video of the reaction of Iron and Sulfur and How to make Water
  2. READ the directions and information as you complete the sheet. (Some items are supposed to be a certain color)
  3. Make sure the color of the label matches the color of the item it describes
  4. Use each color only once
Homework:
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

Jan 17, Tuesday
Test Make ups now. If making up the test today, make sure to go back and complete Schoology activity from today.
Chem4Kids Matter Quiz Today on Schoology!
*Important Points:
  • This will be a quiz grade based on the accuracy of your answers
  • This is an individual activity, but all of the answers are in the text provided
  • You will have ONLY 1 quiz attempt, so make it count!
If you finish early, please read, or work on incomplete assignments until everyone has had a chance to finish

Jan 13, Friday!!!
Checked and covered homework
Viewed Brain Pop Cartoon "Conservation of Mass" (3:13)
Continue with Physical vs. Chemical Change Demos from last time
Conservation of Mass Demo Alka Seltzer (citric acid, naHCO3 and aspirin)
NaHCO3 + H3O+ (from above) ---------> Na+ + H2O + CO2(g) The bubbling is because of carbon dioxide gas formed
  1. Place approx. 30 mL of water into an empty plastic bottle and place on a digital balance along with antacid tablets (on the side)
  2. Drop antacid into water and observe mass as the reaction takes place
  3. Repeat the experiment, but this time crush the bottle a bit before dropping tablets in. Then immediately cap it before the tablets fall in.
  4. Watch the mass during the whole process
Homework:

Jan 12, Thursday
The end of the second marking period is Wed 1/18. Please submit incomplete "i" work NOW and STAY CAUGHT UP!
Viewed Brain Pop Cartoon "Property Changes" (2:27) and Short Video on Props & Changes (3:00)
Covered CH 9 Notes through slide 12
1/2 Sheet Demo Activity "physical OR chemical change?" (Calcite vs. Hammer, Calcite vs. Sharpie, Calcite vs. HCl, Water and Food Coloring, Boiling Water, Dry Ice Sublimation, Balloons, Photosynthesis, Combustion, A Candle that is lit)
Homework: Chemical and Phys. Props and Changes Sheet (due next time)
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter

Jan 11, Wednesday (2-Hour Delay)
Physical vs. Chemical Changes Activity:
  1. Open a New Google Document and Title it as “Your Last Name + Physical vs. Chemical Changes” Example: “McHughPhysicalvsChemicalChanges”
  2. Click “Share” and type in my email address: mchughc@nasdschools.org and share this new doc with me
  3. Now use the Intertnet, textbooks, etc. to do the following….
  4. Briefly describe the difference between a physical change vs. a chemical change
  5. Provide at least 2 examples of each and describe why they are good, correct examples. (Add 2 supporting images to your doc for this step)
  6. Briefly research and describe the concept of “Conservation of Matter” or “Conservation of Mass” in your own words and provide at least 1 good example. (Add 2 supporting images to your doc for this step)

Jan 10, Tuesday
The end of the second marking period is Wed. 1/18 Please submit incomplete "i" work NOW and STAY CAUGHT UP!
CH 8 Test Today
Display this info on front board:
CH 8 Test Today!
Collect any extra credit crossword review puzzles
When finished, please turn in test up front, and work on something quietly, or read, etc. until everyone has had a chance to finish. Thank you.
Homework:

Jan 9, Monday
The end of the second marking period is Wed. 1/18 Please submit incomplete "i" work NOW and STAY CAUGHT UP!
CH 8 Test tomorrow
Check and display homework key
Covered the test content and format
Offered Extra Credit Review Puzzle (due tomorrow)
Kahoot! review of CH 8 as a class
Homework: Study for the test!!!

Jan 6, Friday
CH 8 Test Tuesday 1/10
Check this out!
Introduce a couple of Gas law Problems
Begin work on CH 8 Study Guide
Homework: CH 8 Study Guide
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.
S11.C.1.1.5 Predict the behavior of gases through the application of laws (e.g., Boyle’s law, Charles’ law, or ideal gas law).

Jan 5 Thursday
CH 8 Test Tuesday 1/10
Reminder: Don't forget to turn in completed lab sheets from yesterday
Gas Laws Gizmo *Make sure to read and follow the steps carefully.
If you finish early, work on the CH 8 Hidden Message Puzzle
Homework: Finish Gizmo if not done during class

Jan 4, Wednesday
CH 8 Test Tuesday 1/10
Completed the Boyle's Law Lab (with gas pressure sensors):
  • Question: What is the relationship between the pressure and volume of an ideal gas?
  • Hypothesis: If the pressure of a gas is related to it's volume, then as the volume of a gas.....
  • Please handle pressure sensors with great care! They are expensive and it is possible to blow a seal by applying too much pressure to the plunger. Additionally, be careful when screwing the plunger onto the gas pressure sensor so you don't strip the plastic threads. (Teacher Demo)
  • Make sure you set the plunger to 10 mL before connecting it to the gas pressure sensor
  • Teacher Demo: How to read volume on a syringe plunger, Logger Pro "Events with Entry," and Graph setup (same as Logger Pro Screen)
  • Follow directions on lab sheet, answer questions on answer sheet, graph data on graph paper (1 graph per group is sufficient to answer questions)
  • Group up, grab one laptop per group, login, open Logger Pro, *Open File: Physical Sci with Computers Exp. 30
  • Brief discussion of outcome during final 5 minutes
Homework: Finish Lab Worksheet
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.
S11.C.1.1.5 Predict the behavior of gases through the application of laws (e.g., Boyle’s law, Charles’ law, or ideal gas law).

Jan 3, Tuesday
  1. Welcome back and recap on where we were at before holiday break:
    1. Phases of Matter
    2. Phase Change Diagram
  2. Viewed Ideal Gas Law on Crash Course (10:00) OR Sci Guys (5:00) Sci Guys Charles Law (5:00)
  3. Finished the CH 8 Notes with balloon and Gas Pressure Sensor demonstrations
  4. Extra Time: Begin work on the CH 8 Hidden Message Puzzle
S11.C.1.1.5 Predict the behavior of gases through the application of laws (e.g., Boyle’s law, Charles’ law, or ideal gas law).

Dec 23, Friday
Reminder: Make sure to finish & turn in Water Cycle and Phase Change Gizmos if you haven't yet done so
Checked and covered the homework and warm up
Dry Ice Lab/Demos:
  1. Dry Ice can burn skin! "Why is Dry Ice Dangerous?" (2:00)
  2. A few experiments that can't be safely done at school
Safety Concerns: It is extremely dangerous to handle dry ice without proper personal protective equipment.
  1. DO NOT allow dry ice to contact exposed skin
  2. DO NOT directly inhale the "fog" given off by dry ice
  3. DO NOT remove the dry ice from the lab table without direct permission from your teacher
  4. DO NOT deviate from verbal and written directions in any way whatsoever
Please read carefully, follow directions, be extra careful, and use common sense!
Homework:
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

Dec 22, Thursday (Get Solid CO2 after school)
Have a calculator handy in class today
*Reminder: don't forget to complete & turn in Water Cycle and Phase Change Gizmos if you haven't yet done so
  1. Let's Review: Eureka Evaporation and Condensation and Expansion and Contraction
  2. CH 8 Concept Map and Phase Diagram / Table (on overhead as a group)
  3. Finished the CH 8 Notes with balloon and Gas Pressure Sensor demonstrations
Homework: "8-3: Changes in State" Reinforcement and Study Guide
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

Dec 21, Wednesday
Viewed Temp and Phase Change Videos (1/2 sheet collected for credit)
  1. States of Matter (Glass)
  2. Veritasium
  3. Water Cycle National Science Foundation
Students began work on the Water Cycle Gizmo activity (*Note: you only need to turn in 1 handout per group of 2 students)
Homework: Finish Water Cycle Gizmo

Dec 20, Tuesday
Demo of Phase Change Lab with magnetic stirrer. Take some boiling water, place into a test tube, begin to graph it's temperature, lower the tube into a salty ice water mixture and stir until the test tube water freezes.
Introduced and completed pages 1-3 of the Phase Change Gizmo:
  1. Use Safari and login to explorelearning.com with login info on upper-right corner of front board
  2. You may work with one partner for this activity
(NOTE: You should try to get through all questions on page 3. If you start page 3 but don't finish, you may need to redo the whole page again)
Homework:
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

Dec 19, Monday (Refer to 2016 Archive)
Reminder: Don't forget to finish and/or work to improve your Energy, Work, and Power post-test on Schoology soon!
Introduce Phase Change Lab (Demo)
Covered CH 8 Notes through all of phase changes
Revisit Temp. vs. Time graph for Phase Change Lab Demo
Extra Time? Eureka Evaporation and Condensation and Expansion and Contraction
Homework: Answer any remaining lab questions
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

Dec 16, Friday
Checked and covered the homework
Viewed Brain Pop Cartoon "States of Matter" (4:30) and Study.com "The Kinetic Molecular Theory" (1st 4 min.)
At this point you should use the remaining class time to:
  1. Finish or Retake the Energy, Work, and Power Post-Test on Schoology
  2. Do the Hidden Message Puzzle (Extra Credit)
  3. Get caught up on any "n" (incomplete) assignments in Sapphire (display on screen)
Homework:
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

Dec 15, Thursday
Covered CH 8 Notes through thermal expansion. With Demonstrations:
  1. Equal volume of liquid in various containers
  2. Gas vs. liquid in a syringe plunger
  3. Blow torch demonstrations (Observe, Predict, Discuss)
  4. Demo: Aluminum Can vs. Atmospheric Pressure (Use torch for best effect)
    1. Observe
    2. Hypothesize (Possible explanations?) Elicit responses
    3. Time Bender Video Explanation (2:00)
    4. O.K. But can this happen on a larger scale? 55-gallon drum and a Railroad Car
Homework: "8-1: Matter and Temp" Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow.
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

December 14, Wednesday (Have Ice Ready for Tomorrow)
  1. Finish CH 5&7 Test
  2. Energy, Work and Power Post-Test on Schoology *Note: You have access to the formulas necessary to solve the problems, and this will be automatically scored and entered into Sapphire as a major quiz grade
A Special Request for Period 6...
Homework: Finish the post-test on Schoology

December 13, Tuesday (Get Ice) Fac. Meeting After School
Display this info on front board:
CH 5&7 Test Today!
Collect any extra credit crossword review puzzles
When finished, please turn in test up front, and work on something quietly, or read, etc. until everyone has had a chance to finish. Thank you.
Homework:

December 12, Monday
Have a calculator handy today
CH 5 & 7 Test Tomorrow!
Kahoot review of CH 5 & 7; please make sure your screen name is your real name so I may award you participation credit after class. Thanks!
Offered Extra Credit Review Puzzle
Homework: Study for the Test (Kahoot Review is available 24-7; see Schoology for details)

December 9, Friday
Have a calculator handy today
CH 5 & 7 Test Tuesday... (Even if we have off on Monday due to weather!!! :)
Checked and covered HWK
Viewed Best Rube Goldberg Ever? and Red Bull "Athlete Machine" (10 min.)
Use class time today to complete the CH 5 & 7 Test Study Guide (as a group to save time?)
Use any remaining time to begin the Extra Credit Review Puzzle
Homework: Study for Tuesday's test

December 8, Thursday
Have a calculator handy today
CH 5 & 7 Test Tuesday
Checked and covered Efficiency Problems

Demos of solving for IMA, AMA, and efficiency; all formulas available on board:
  1. Inclined plane
  2. Various Levers
  3. Pulley
Begin work on "Using Machines" Reinforcement and Study Guide
Homework: Using Machines Reinforcement and Study Guide (due next time)

December 7, Wednesday
Have a calculator handy today
CH 5 & 7 Test Tuesday
Checked and covered homework.
Student Whiteboards: Practice Problems already printed on the back of your notes
Demos of solving for IMA, AMA, and efficiency; all formulas available on board
Intro and Begin Efficiency Problems. A few Important Tips:
  1. Read problems carefully to identify Fe, Fr, de, and dr
  2. Usually Fe < Fr and de > dr
  3. Work to overcome friction = Work input - Work output
Homework: Finish Efficiency Problems

Dec 6, Tuesday
Eureka on inclined plane and wheel & axle (9 min. total)
Finish CH 5&7 Notes (12 slides) (with force sensor demo of wheel and axle?)
Homework: The Simple Machines Reinforcement and Study Guide due next time

Dec 5, Monday
Collect any remaining completed pulley gizmos
Complete the Inclined Plane Lab (Groups of 3 or 4). *Note: you were not present for this lab, do some work with the Inclined Plane gizmo on explorelearning.com and submit or email the answers to the gizmo questions to me for credit.
Important Points for this activity:
  1. 1 laptop and 1 handout per group of about 3 people
  2. Open the Logger Pro application and plug force sensor into USB port
  3. Make sure you zero the force sensor EVERY time before pulling, lifting, etc.
  4. Click "Collect" (Play button) just after you start pulling with a slow, steady force
  5. Click "Statistics" (1/2 button) and use the mean as your effort force
  6. All necessary info/directions may be found in your lab handout. *read and follow directions
When you're done, turn in the lab and finish pulley gizmo if you haven't yet done so
Homework:

Dec 2, Friday
Complete pulley gizmo on www.explorelearning.com
  • Maximum of 2 people per group
  • Login as hsstudent and avoid using Chrome browser
  • Handouts are on top of laptop cart (You only need to turn in 1 per group)
Homework: Finish Gizmo

Dec 1, Thursday
Viewed Eureka vid. on pulleys
Covered notes slides 36-41
Complete Pulley Lab w/ force sensors (as a class). *Note: Many people refer to a single fixed pulley wheel as a "flexible" 1st class lever
Viewed "Mechanical Advantage of Pulleys" 12:30 (time permitting)
Homework:

Nov 30, Wednesday
Viewed Eureka on Mechanical Advantage
Lever Lab Demo (as a class):
  1. Display lab sheet on screen
  2. Random student selection for reading lab steps, helping to answer questions, etc.
  3. *Note: Please pay close attention, ask questions, etc. since you'll be expected to know how to solve these types of problems on our next test.
Extra Time?
  1. Demonstrate how it may be possible to lift a person with only a single finger
  2. Simple Machines Hidden Message Bonus Puzzle
Homework: Don't forget to finish the Lever Gizmo sometime soon

Nov 29, Tuesday
Viewed eureka cartoon on Levers
Best way to remember 3 classes of levers: Anyone remember the creditreport.com commercials?
Remember: "F.R.E. go in the middle of 1.2.3." (Where F = Fulcrum, R = Resistance Force, and E = Effort Force)
Review the 3 classes of levers. Remember, "F.R.E. go in the middle of 1.2.3." (Where F = Fulcrum, R = Resistance Force, and E = Effort Force)
Students began work on lever gizmo *Maximum of 2 people per group (per laptop)
Homework: Finish Lever Gizmo

Nov 22, Tuesday
Check and cover homework
Short streaming vids: Thanksgiving holiday safety 1, 2, 3! (3:00 total)
Revisiting Volume Activity:
  1. Make observations and measurements in order to answer the 2 main questions for this activity. *Note: The 3 most accurate groups will earn choice prizes!
  2. Please give me your volume estimate for this room once you calculate it
  3. Explanation of how many cubic centimeters are in 1 cubic meter
  4. 3 Important Reminders:
    1. Assume the room is a perfect rectangle (ignore the section near our front door)
    2. Remember the difference between the terms accuracy and precision
    3. Anytime you multiply or divide measurements, you should round your answer to the fewest number of digits within the problem itself
  5. Explanation of how I arrived at my estimate
  6. Award prizes

Nov 21, Monday
Viewed eureka cartoon on Levers
Covered the CH 5&7 Notes slides thru 3 Lever Classes with:
  • Prybar demo
  • Lever hooked up to a force sensor at various positions
Best way to remember 3 classes of levers: Anyone remember the creditreport.com commercials?
Remember, "F.R.E. go in the middle of 1.2.3." (Where F = Fulcrum, R = Resistance Force, and E = Effort Force)
Homework: Why we use Machines Reinforcement and Study Guide (due next time; Use notes from today and/or purple textbook pgs. 180-185)

Nov 18, Friday
Have a calculator handy today.
Introduced and completed the Work & Power Lab: Walking vs. Running up a Flight of Stairs
Procedure & Tips for Lab today:
Before you gather data:
Weight
Mass
Gravity
Is a measure of the Force of gravity between 2 objects.
Is the amount of matter in an object.
Is an invisible force of attraction between all objects.
Expressed in Newtons. (English system uses Pounds)
Expressed in kg
Causes objects to accelerate toward earth at a rate of 10 m/s/s
Weight = mass x gravitational acc.
On earth a mass of 1 kg x 10 m/s/s has a weight of 10 Newtons. (this is equal to 2.25 pounds)


So.....
  • If you know your weight in pounds, divide by 2.25 pounds/kg to find your mass (this never changes wherever you go in the universe). Then multiply by 10 m/s/s to determine your weight in Newtons here in earth. (this would change on the moon)
  • If not, you can measure your force of weight in N on the force sensor up front
  • Another quick way to get your weight in Newton's is to multiply your weight in pounds by 4.448
  • The vertical distance you will move up our flight of stairs = ___ meters (big open stair well)
  • SAFETY: We will first clock everyone's walking time going up the stairs. Once everyone has finished, we will clock your running times. You may "skip steps" but please don't do anything that could result in an injury to yourself or anyone else. Thanks in advance!
  • You should only need to bring a pen/pencil and your worksheet
  • Enlist the help of a student timer as needed
After you gather data:
  • Work (Joules) = Force (Newtons) X distance (meters)
  • Power (Watts) = Work (Joules) / time (seconds)
  • What is your power in Watts? In English system units of horsepower?
  • I usually only get a small number of students who achieve at least 1 horsepower (746 Watts). Why do you think this is?
  • Extra Time? Add the following questions to your worksheet:
    • Use the G.P.E. = m x g x h formula to calculate how much stored energy you have while standing at the top of our flight of stairs.
    • A student had exactly 1 horsepower while running up our flight of stairs. If it took the student 2.30 seconds, what is his Force of weight?

Nov 17, Thursday
Have a calculator handy today
Returned and covered the CH 4 Test
Checked and covered the homework
Viewed:Energy, Work, and Power vid (3:34) and Study.com Work and Power (5:00)
Preview of tomorrow's activity: On a half sheet of paper, solving for the amount of work you perform climbing a flight of stairs (force plate available to measure Force of Weight) Now solve for Power
Extra Time? Demo of work and power in lifting a book vs. sliding it
Homework:

November 16, Wednesday
Have a calculator handy today
Checked and covered homework
Covered CH 5&7 Notes through "Power." (Demo of lifting a known mass with force sensor)
Introduced and completed the work and power lab (as a class)
Procedure & Tips for Lab today:
  • Weight is a force expressed in Newtons. Weight = mass (kg) X gravity (10 m/s/s)
  • Most of our spring scales display mass in grams and force in Newtons. Digital force sensors express force in Newtons, BUT BOTH MUST BE PROPERLY ZEROED BEFORE USING!
  • Your goal during this lab is to compare the work needed to lift, then slide a small book vs. the work needed to lift, then slide a large book.
  • Work (Joules) = Force (Newtons) X distance (meters)
  • Power (Watts) = Work (Joules) / time (seconds)
Homework: Work and Power Problems sheet 1 with hints to problems 1-4

November 15, Tuesday
Have a calculator handy today
Collected any completed GPE Gizmo worksheets
Viewed Eureka vids: Work, Kinetic Energy, and Potential Energy (in order)
Covered CH 5&7 Notes through slide 10
GPE and KE sample (due next time)
Force Plate Demos:
  1. How much work is done lifting a textbook, back pack, etc.?
  2. How much work do you do during a push up?
  3. Why work is not done when pushing an stationary object nor when carrying something!?
Homework: "Energy and Work "" Reinforcement and Study Guide

November 14, Monday
Schedule test make-ups
Science of NFL Newton's 2nd Law and the concept of Impulse
Demo: Dropping various objects on a force plate. What are some factors that seem to affect the amount of energy delivered at the moment of impact?
Brief explanation of the formulas for Gravitational Potential Energy and Kinetic Energy
Students completed the Gravitational Potential Energy Gizmo
Homework: Finish GPE Gizmo

Nov 11, Friday
Viewed Greatest Physics Discoveries with Bill Nye (question sheet will be collected)

November 10, Thursday
Have a calculator handy today
CH 4 Test Today
Collect any extra credit crossword review puzzles
When finished, please turn in test up front, and work on CH 4 Hidden Message Puzzle or read, etc.
Homework:

Nov 9, Wednesday
CH 4 Test Tomorrow
Have a calculator handy today
Offered CH 4 crossword review puzzle for extra credit (due next time)
Checked and displayed homework
Kahoot review of CH 4 as a class
Homework: Study!!!

Nov 8, Tuesday
CH 4 Test Thursday Nov 10
Have a calculator handy today.
Checked and covered homework
Second Conservation of Momentum practice problem on-screen
Finish incomplete gizmos or begin work on CH 4 study guide
Homework: CH 4 Study Guide

Nov 7, Monday
CH 4 Test Thursday Nov 10
Have your remaining chapter notes out and ready
Collected any remaining gizmo worksheets from last time
Viewed Mythbusters: 2 scenarios demonstrating enormous momentum(4:00) and Mythbusters (1:30) "When Forward Momentum = Backward Momentum"
Finished remaining chapter notes on momentum
Demos: Momentum & Newton's 3rd Law: Basketball vs. tennis ball, racket ball, etc.
Video Clip : Conservation of Momentum from the Int'l. Space Station
Demo: of coupled masses on Explorelearning Air Track Gizmo
Introduced momentum problems (rearranging the formula and intro to the conservation of momentum formula)
Homework: Momentum Problems Sheet

Nov 4, Friday
CH 4 Test Next Week
Check and cover homework
Students completed the Air Track: Momentum gizmo
Important Points:
  1. This is a friction-less air track and we're keeping Elasticity set to 1.0. Therefore, momentum will be perfectly conserved when objects collide.
  2. Momentum (p) = mass X velocity
If you finish early, finish and turn in any last-minute 1st marking period work
Return Quizzes
Homework: Finish momentum gizmo (due tomorrow)

Nov 3, Thursday
CH 4 Test Next Week
Collected any remaining gizmos
Viewed: NFL Science Newton's 3rd Law of Motion (Action-Reaction)
Covered CH 4 Notes slides 13-17 w/ swinging mass demo, penny in a balloon demo, viewed E.O.P. streaming video 9:20-10:30
Additional Demos: Newton's Cradle, Force Plate demo of Action-Reaction (Make predictions, test with force plate)
Viewed B.O.P. video 12:30-16:00 and Veritasium on 3rd Law (4:30)
Homework: Action-Reaction worksheet (due next time)

Nov 2, Wednesday
Introduce Projectile Motion with demos:
Covered CH 4 Notes slides 8-12
Students completed golf range gizmo
  • The ball will not disappear from the screen (you estimate when it's a hole in one)
  • Try to observe how horizontal and vertical velocities change during different trials
Homework: Finish Golf Range Gizmo

Nov 1, Tuesday
Have a calculator handy today
Quiz Today on Newton's 2nd Law of Motion (F = m x a)
Myth Busters: Death by Falling Penny (Season 1 Episode 4)
1/2 Question Sheet will be collected for credit

Oct 31, Monday
Newton's 2nd Law quiz tomorrow (The quiz also deals with falling objects, terminal velocity, etc.)
Important Announcement:
  1. Turn in any "n" (incomplete) work ASAP; 1st marking period ends Tomorrow!
  2. Extra Credit is available on class website
Checked and covered the homework
Viewed Youtube vid on Peregrin Falcon. (5:00) Pond Swooping (4:00)
Students completed Free Fall Tower Gizmo
Homework: Finish gizmo, prep for quiz tomorrow

Oct 28, Friday
Newton's 2nd Law quiz Tuesday 11/1 (The quiz also deals with falling objects, terminal velocity, etc.)
Brief intro of suspended motion sensor lab setup (Cover tips below and try dropping various objects)
Terminal Velocity of Falling Objects w/ Vernier
  • Demo Lab directions sheet and opening/using Logger Pro on screen
  • Keep at least 2 books on the base of the ring stand at all times!
  • Make sure the metal rods and motion sensor are secured before beginning to experiment
  • Make sure the motion sensor is aimed directly downward (adjust your cable as needed)
  • Demo how to analyze/interpret the graphs of a falling object (balloon?) to ID: drop point, land point, drop time, land time, etc.
  • Wait to drop items until you hear the clicking sound, and repeat until you get smooth curves on both graphs
  • You don't need to mark a spot 0.5 m away from the table; just make sure the table isn't interfering with data collection
  • You don't need to print graphs
When you finish, please turn in lab sheet up front and begin homework sheet
Homework: "CH 4 "Accelerated Motion" Reinforcement and Study Guide

Oct 27, Thursday
Checked and covered Newton's 2nd Law Problems
Return and cover CH 3 Test
Demo: How many people have ever wanted to throw something at a teacher's face?
Covered CH 4 Notes thru slide 7 w/ air res. demos (balloon, falling paper, book, objects of varying mass)
View clips: Hammer vs. Feather on the Moon Wingsuit Base Project (1:35)
Landing without a Parachute!? (3:00) Jeb Corliss (Man vs. Rock @ 120 mph) Jeb Corlis ("Never give up") Actual Landing without a Parachute (For Real!) US Army wing suit distance Current Wing Suit Records Wikipedia
Homework:

Oct 26, Wednesday
Collect any completed gizmo worksheets
Covered CH 4 Notes thru slide 5
Demonstrations of Newton's 2nd Law
  1. Measuring the Force of Weight using a Force Plate. Convert to Mass.
  2. Which projectile will travel further and faster (which has greater acceleration)?
  3. Baseball bat vs. basketball / bowling ball
Time Permitting: Study.com Newton's 2nd Law (8:00)
Worked Newton's 2nd Law of Motion worksheet as a class
Begin work on Newton's 2nd Law Practice
Homework: Newton's 2nd Law practice problems

Oct 25, Tuesday
Important Announcement:
  1. Turn in any "n" (incomplete) work ASAP; 1st marking period ends Nov 1st
  2. Extra Credit is available on class website
Administer / Schedule Test Make-ups
Viewed:
  1. NFL Science Newton's 1st Law of Motion (Inertia)
  2. Eureka on Newton's 2nd Law of Motion (Acceleration)
Newton's 2nd Law Gizmo
  • Each Fan produces 10 N of force
  • You get acceleration from the gizmo
Reminder: Finish and turn in any other incomplete explorelearning assignments
Homework: Finish Gizmo if not done in class

Oct 24, Monday
Viewed Extreme Freefall DVD; question sheet collected for credit at the end of class

Oct 21, Friday
CH 3 Test Today!
Have a calculator handy today
Collect extra credit review puzzles.
When finished, please read or work on something quietly until everyone has finished
Homework:

Oct 20, Thursday
CH 3 Test Tomorrow; extra credit review puzzle due then.
Have a calculator handy today
Handout extra credit review puzzle
Collect remaining gizmos from last time
Check and Display CH 3 Study Guide KEY
Discuss test content and format. Be prepared for short answer questions on: inertia, friction, comparing weight and mass, and comparing distance-time and velocity-time graphs.
Kahoot review of CH 3 as a class
Homework: Study for Test Tomorrow

Oct 19, Wednesday
CH 3 Test Friday 10/21. Check website for details on how to access the Kahoot review to study from
Return quizzes later this period
Check and cover mass and weight problems
Introduce and Demo an example or 2 for the Weight vs. Mass Gizmo activity
Students completed Weight vs. Mass Gizmo (Use Safari browser; go to explorelearning.com)
  • Use balance to determine mass and spring scale to determine weight
  • CLICK MOUSE ICON DIRECTLY ON BALANCE AND SCALE LINE FOR EXACT READING
  • Express mass of objects in kg! (this is crucial when using the W = m x g formula)
Continue work on CH 3 Study Guide
Homework: Weight and mass gizmo sheets AND CH 3 Study Guide

Oct 18, Tuesday (Debate; losing a section of phys. sci.)
  1. Study.com on Weight, Mass, and Gravity (6:00)
  2. Review using a force sensor to directly measure Force of Weight
  3. Review Weight and Mass Problems (due tomorrow)
  4. Use class time today to begin work on CH 3 Study Guide

Oct 17, Monday
CH 3 Test Friday 10/21
Collect any completed gizmo worksheets
Eureka on gravity & Eureka on weight vs. mass (9:00)
Covered remaining CH 3 Notes with (100 g mass = 1 N of weight demo) and the formula Weight = mass x gravity
Demo: Comparing mass (the amount of matter) measured with a balance to weight (a force) measured with a scale, force sensor, etc.
Investigating the answers to these questions:
  1. How do we measure the Mass of a sample in grams?
  2. How do we convert this mass into kg?
  3. How do we convert this into a Force of Weight in Newtons?
  4. What are some ways we can directly measure the Force of Weight of the same object?
  5. Can we measure a person's Force of Weight and convert it into mass in kg?
Intro and begin work on Mass and Weight Practice Problems and CH 3 Study Guide
Homework: Mass and Weight problems (due Wednesday 10/19)
Homework: CH 3 Study Guide (due Thursday 10/20)

Oct 14, Friday
Collect any completed gizmo worksheets from last time
Friction Lab w/ Vernier Force Sensors:
  1. Omit Part 2 of directions, data table, and question on back
  2. Groups of 3 grab 1 laptop and login
  3. Brief lab Introduction up front:
    1. Show lab setup up front and explain variables being tested
    2. How to plug in USB sensor, Open Logger Pro, Physical Science Folder and Experiment #19
    3. Zero your force sensor (Depends on how you're holding/using it)
    4. Demo of how to determine force needed to pull block with a SLOW, STEADY, STRAIGHT pull...then click "Collect." This lab works best when a team of 3 establishes a good RHYTHM. 1 Puller, 1 Computer Person, 1 Recorder
    5. Wait to calculate averages and answer questions until you're all done collecting data
    6. Please leave lab table as you found it
Homework: Friction Lab Sheets (due tomorrow)
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

Oct 13, Thursday
Continue CH 3 Notes 16-21:
  • It's always fun to start out with a cartoon!: Eureka on inertia
  • Inertia (Roller Skates, Baseball Bats, Skateboards and why all objects really "want" to behave like an air hockey puck)
  • On-screen examples of Balanced vs. unbalanced forces (Net Force) "Simple Net Force Game"
  • Toy CD Hovercraft
  • Friction (sliding notebook paper vs. sand paper w/ and w/ out pressure)
As a Class: Quick Fan Cart Forces and Roller Coaster Friction Gizmo *We should be able to quickly and easily complete this in about 10 min. If not, any remaining parts, questions, etc. will be assigned as homework.
Homework: Finish today's gizmo and turn in next time
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

Oct 12, Wednesday
Have a calculator handy today
Speed and Acceleration Quiz Today!
When finished, please read or work on something quietly until everyone has finished
Extra Time? View Inertia Video (8:00) Study.com
Forces and Motion streaming video (4:00-24:00)
Short Acceleration vids.
Homework:

Oct 11, Tuesday
Have a calculator handy today
Speed and Acceleration Quiz tomorrow! (Study Speed Problems and Acc. Probs worksheets)
Check and cover homework
View Eureka Acceleration part 2 video clip
Complete The Car Race graphing worksheet (as a group)
Speed and Acceleration Kahoot Review
Homework: Quiz tomorrow!
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

Oct 7, Friday
Speed and Acceleration Quiz Next Week
Checked and covered homework
Introduced and began the Fan Cart Acceleration Gizmo:
  • Volunteer to help with directions as I demo on big screen?
  • Identify, Label and Use the graphs on the back side of sheet to answer questions to Part II as a class (reward correct answers)
  • Demo: Walking away from motion sensor at constant velocity vs. Accelerating away from it
Introduce and begin 2nd round of acceleration practice problems
Homework: Acceleration Problems 2
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

Oct 6, Thursday
Have a calculator handy today
Collect Gizmo worksheets from last time
Returned and covered CH 1 & 2 Test
Viewed acceleration video clips (YouTube, Local, or Study.com (7:00)
Covered CH 3 Notes on Acceleration
Returned to earlier clips to solve for acceleration (jot these down)
Open an online speed units converter or ask Siri / Google for help with this part
Introduced and began Acceleration Problems.
Homework: Finish Acceleration Problems
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

Oct 5, Wednesday
Please keep a calculator handy indefinitely; preferably one of the scientific ones I have up front
Demo: A Quick demo/discussion of graphs generated by a motion sensor
Students began the Distance vs. Time graph Gizmo. (Cross out #6 on back and ignore the directions to put all answers in a Word document. Simply answer the questions directly on your worksheet and turn it in when you're done.)
Homework: Finish Gizmo worksheet from today
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

Oct 4, Tuesday
Warm Up: Graphing Speed and Slithering Speeds
Reminder: Please take the Energy, Work and Power Pre-test on Schoology if you were not here yesterday *NOTE: This is only a pretest. Therefore your answers WILL NOT be graded based on correctness. Instead, you will receive credit simply by completing and submitting the assessment on Schoology
Completed Activity: Calculating Average Speed.
  • Teacher demo of using Google Maps and calculating the average speed to some destination
  • 1 laptop per pair of students should suffice
  • Important: DO NOT turn off laptop until you finish the activity and questions (final question still requires the map app.)
  • Discuss questions once everyone has finished
  • If you finish early, begin work on the practice homework sheet below
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions

Oct 3, Monday (*Note to self: Use Motion Sensors, not Video Capture!)
Checked and covered homework
Take the Energy, Work and Power Pre-test on Schoology *NOTE: This is only a pretest. Therefore your answers WILL NOT be graded based on correctness. Instead, you will receive credit simply by completing and submitting the assessment on Schoology today.
Activity: Comparing Your Average Speed vs. Instantaneous Speed
Demo and Display steps. *Note: 1 laptop per group of 3 should suffice
  1. Login, and open the application Logger Pro
  2. Plug motion sensor into USB port. (The sensor should automatically be recognized)
  3. Make sure the sensor is facing a wide open area, and nothing is obstructing it's "click path"
  4. Have a person stand right up next to the sensor. Click the Green Play Button on screen and begin to walk away from the sensor once the clicking begins. Repeat as needed until you get a good graph.
On a piece of graph paper, do the following:
  1. Sketch the graph(s) that you generated from your laptop (make sure to correctly label the x and y axis including the title of each axis and the units of measure)
  2. Try clicking, holding, and dragging across several different regions of the line graph. By clicking on the Stats button, you should be able to find an m value for slope.
  3. Briefly explain in your own words what the graph(s) are showing and how you can tell by looking at the graphs. Explain in a sentence or two.
  4. Briefly explain what the slope of the position (distance) vs. time graph is actually showing us.
  5. Turn in your graph sheet with your name on top
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions

Sept 30, Friday
Please keep a calculator handy indefinitely; preferably one like the scientific ones I have in a basket up front
Schedule test make-ups
Viewed "Frame of Reference" (2:30) and/or kids covering "Frame of Ref."
Covered CH 3 Notes thru slide 9
Viewed Study.com "Speed and Velocity" (7:00)
Began Speed Problems together. For extra help with this, check out this nutty teacher.
Homework: Finish Speed Problems
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).
Extra Time? Check out:
  • Speed and Velocity with triangle formula method
  • Viewed Forces and Motion streaming video (4 min)
  • Example of calculating average speed walking across the room (Logger Pro: Insert Video, Linear Fit of x)

Sept 29, Thursday
CH 1&2 Test Today
Collect extra credit review puzzles
Display on Board: "You have this period to finish the test. When finished, please turn in your test and work on something quietly or read until everyone has finished. Thanks!"
S11.A.2.1.3 Use data to make inferences and predictions, or to draw conclusions, demonstrating understanding of experimental limits.

Sept 28, Wednesday
CH 1&2 Test Tomorrow!
Grab a laptop if you aren't using your phone for kahoot today
Checked and displayed the chapter study guide key
Discussed tomorrow's test content/format: Vocab matching, multiple choice, problem solving (Show 1. correct formula, 2. # answer, 3. correct units)
Kahoot Review of CH 1&2
Homework: 1. Study for test 2. The CH 1&2 test review puzzle may be completed for extra credit. (By Tomorrow)
S11.A.2.2.2 Explain how technology (e.g., GPS, spectroscope, scanning electron microscope, pH meter, probe, interface, imaging technology, telescope) is used to extend human abilities and precision.
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).
M11.A.1.1 Represent and/or use numbers in equivalent forms (e.g., integers, fractions, decimals, percents, square roots, exponents and scientific notation).

Sept 27, Tuesday
CH 1&2 Test Thursday
Check and cover Temperature conversion lab/homework
Demo how to create a kahoot account (Best thing to study for any test in this course)
Use class time today to finish Density Gizmo, any other incomplete assignments, then begin work on study guide, review puzzle.
Handout Extra Credit Review Puzzle
Homework: Chapter 1&2 Study Guide
S11.A.2.1.3 Use data to make inferences and predictions, or to draw conclusions, demonstrating understanding of experimental limits.
M11.A.3.1 Apply the order of operations in computation and in problem-solving situations.

Sept 26, Monday
CH 1&2 Test Thursday
Have a calculator handy in class
Viewed Brain Pop Cartoon "Temperature" (2:37) and Eureka video on temperature
Introduced and practiced using temperature conversion formulas with handheld infrared thermometer. Don't forget "Order of Operations." Other possible demos may include: Temperature vs. Time Graphs, Sodium Acetate Trihydrate (exothermic reaction)
Introduced and completed temperature lab activity:
Safety:
  • Please handle glass thermometers carefully. Tell me right away if you break one.
  • Laboratory salts are toxic! DO NOT eat or drink anything in lab and always wear personal protective equipment when necessary
  • Some samples may be hot!
Object Descriptions for Temperature Lab:
  1. Body Temp Under Arm
  2. Ice Water
  3. Ice Water with Salt
  4. 100 Watt Light Bulb Near Surface (Use great care not to break these) Don't stare! :)
  5. 50 Watt Light Bulb Near Surface
  6. Air Temp Near Ceiling (there is a meter stick with a thermometer attached to it)
  7. Air Temp Near Floor
At each station, allow the thermometer to acclimate (wait until it is not changing) and estimate your measurement. (Remember on a physical scale with divisions, you should always estimate exactly 1 digit.)
After completing your first station, take the thermometer with you to the rest of the stations.
Homework: Temperature conversion sheet (on back of your Temp Lab Sheet)
S11.A.2.2.2 Explain how technology (e.g., GPS, spectroscope, scanning electron microscope, pH meter, probe, interface, imaging technology, telescope) is used to extend human abilities and precision.
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

Sept 23, Friday
CH 1&2 Test Next Week
  1. Grab your laptop and headphones on top of cart if you don't have earbuds
  2. Login to EDPuzzle.com as a Student using your school username / password
  3. Join our class if you haven't yet done so (see directions from Sept. 15th)
  4. Complete the 3 short EDPuzzles (you have one attempt that is graded on correctness)
  5. Finish the Density Gizmo with your partner and turn in when finished
Homework: Finish any of these things if you didn't get done during class

Sept 22, Thursday
CH 1 & 2 Test Next Week
Have a calculator handy in class
Covered remaining CH 2 Notes
  • Class Density Activity
  • Main Question: How does the density of an object compare to whether it floats or sinks in water?
Object Descriptions for Density Activity:
    1. Wooden block
    2. Grey slab block
    3. Cloudy block
    4. Cloudy slab
    5. Copper block
    6. Grey block
    7. Can of regular soda
    8. Can of diet soda
  1. (Please Note: The typical 12 oz. can of soda is labeled as 355 mL liquid volume. However, the aluminum can itself does take up some space (volume). A good estimate for the total volume of the can + soda = 380 mL)
  2. Small groups (rows) make volume measurements and share with the class (have actual measures on hand)
  3. Place objects on digital balance to determine mass (record these values on your sheet)
  4. Calculate the density of the samples
  5. Predict flotation based on density, and test it in the enormous clear water jug
  6. Answer questions, discuss, and turn in sheet
  7. Viewed How Scientists Work video
Homework: Answer the questions from the Class Density Activity today
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).
S11.A.2.1.3 Use data to make inferences and predictions, or to draw conclusions, demonstrating understanding of experimental limits.
M11.A.3.1 Apply the order of operations in computation and in problem-solving situations.
M11.A.3.2.1 Use estimation to solve problems.

September 21, Wednesday
Have a calculator handy in class today (or use the one on your laptop)
Please grab your laptop and have Density Problems homework out and ready to be checked
Go over Density Problems homework
Brief teacher demo of the Density Laboratory Gizmo functions
Handout density gizmo (due tomorrow)
Work with a partner to complete the Density Gizmo
Essential Questions to discuss (stop activity with a few min. of class left):
  1. Do objects with high mass always sink?
  2. Can you tell whether an object will float by knowing the mass OR volume alone? Explain
  3. What pattern do you notice about the density of objects that float vs. those that sink?
  4. What happens if you change the density of the liquid the objects are dropped into?
  5. Which of the 3 crowns is(are) made of real gold? (gold has a density of 19.3 g/mL)
Homework: density gizmo (due tomorrow)

September 20, Tuesday (Get cans of regular and diet soda)
Have a calculator handy in class
Bell Ringer: Completed Measuring Length and Mass Worksheet
Cover and discuss answers
Covered density and formulas notes
Viewed Eureka cartoons on "Mass" and "Volume & Density" (9:00 total) "Buoyancy" (3:00)
Introduce density problems worksheet
Homework: Density Problems Sheet
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).
S11.A.2.1.3 Use data to make inferences and predictions, or to draw conclusions, demonstrating understanding of experimental limits.

September 19, Monday
Demo identical volume of water in a graduated cylinder vs. a beaker. Which is more precise and how can you tell? (Local doc? Or see email from cmchugh 9/21/15)
Demonstration of determining volume by water displacement (block of known volume in water)
Refresher on zeroing the balance and taking a mass measurement *Very important to start with largest mass rider and make sure riders "click" into place
Demos for determining mass by subtracting mass of empty container. (Triple Beam vs. Digital)
Students completed the mass lab. (Attention to accuracy and precision)
Object Descriptions for Mass Lab:
  1. Unsharpened #2 pencil
  2. single hole puncher
  3. 100 g mass ?
  4. D battery
  5. large paper clip
  6. metal cube (complete the back side of lab sheet at this station)
  7. 10 mL H2O (just the mass of the water itself)
  8. metal pellets (just the mass of the pellets)
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 16, Friday
Cosmic Voyage Video (Question sheet will be collected for credit)

September 15, Thursday
Have a calculator handy today
  1. Students used SAFARI or Firefox to go to explorelearning.com and begin working on the Triple Beam Balance Gizmo. (pairs)
Homework:
  1. Finish the Gizmo worksheet (if not done in class)
  2. Login to EDPuzzle.com and Complete the assignment "How to Measure Length Correctly" *Note: There are various questions and answers, therefore, you are required to carefully view this video and answer questions as you go along. There is only one attempt, so make it count. This assignment will be auto-graded and entered into Sapphire. If you have not done this yet,
    1. Go to EDPuzzle.com and Login using Google (Same as your school login info)
    2. Click "Join a Class" and (Period 4 Code: pefokui or visit this link)
    3. (Period 6 Code: owgivza or visit this link)
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 14, Wednesday
Quote of the Day: "The difference between something good and something great is attention to detail." - Charles R. Swindoll
Have a calculator handy today
  1. Checked and covered Measuring Length Skills Practice worksheet
  2. Practice estimating measurements via pictures, overheads, etc. (Local doc? Or see email from cmchugh 9/16/15)
  3. Begin the "Measuring Volume" lab. Lab sheets were collected. (NOTE: See me about making up this lab if you were absent today)
*Note: provide a lot of individual and group support as groups begin taking measurements

Tips:
  1. Read liquid volume at eye level, from the bottom of the meniscus. (Hold a white paper behind if necessary)
  2. Know what each division is (precision) and ALWAYS make sure the last digit is a CLOSE estimate (accuracy). It may help to underline the estimated digit.
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 13, Tuesday
  • Covered a few note slides on "accuracy vs. precision"
  • Viewed Accuracy and Precision (2:25) and Nice Accuracy vs. Precision Explanation (6:00)
  • Students completed the "Measuring Length" activity:
    • Object Descriptions for Length Lab (Please make sure you label these in order on your sheet):
    1. Length of File folder
    2. Length of Index Card
    3. Length of Window Ledge (back window)
    4. Height of Lab table (tall table)
    5. File cabinet height
    6. Width of your desk
    7. Length of 1 single floor tile
    8. Length of Periodic Table
    9. Length of tissue box
Which 2 divisions does your quantity lie between? Estimate 1 digit!
Finally, make sure you measure each item using each side of the 4-sided meter stick and always estimate 1 digit.
Regroup up front with at least 5-10 min. remaining to discuss activity questions and collect worksheets
Homework:
  1. Finish the questions from your "Measuring Length Lab" today
  2. Measuring Length Skills Practice worksheet
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality)

September 12, Monday
Quote of the Day: "There are two possible outcomes: if the result confirms the hypothesis, then you've made a measurement. If the result is contrary to the hypothesis, then you've made a discovery." - Enrico Fermi
  1. Grab your laptop and move together with your partner right away today.
  2. Demonstrate how to Join our EDPuzzle Class:
    1. Go to EDPuzzle.com and Login using Google (Same as your school login info)
    2. Click "Join a Class" and (Period 4 Code: pefokui or visit this link)
    3. (Period 6 Code: owgivza or visit this link)
  3. Time to finish "Scientific Notation and Scale of the Universe" activity located on your school Google Drive. *Please share file to me if you haven't already. Thanks!
  4. Extra Time? How Simple Ideas Lead to Scientific Discovery (7:32)
Homework: Finish the "Scientific Notation and Scale of the Universe" activity
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality)

September 9, Friday
"Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything." -Wyatt Earp
  1. Practiced estimating measurements on overhead (Quick 1 or 2)
  2. Checked and covered metric conversion practice / Display worksheet key
  3. Introduce and begin activity "Scientific Notation and the Scale of the Universe" (this may be a document shared to you on your school Google Drive (Click "Shared with Me") or made available within Chapter 1 on Schoology (or both). Either way, access this document, read and follow the directions contained within. *Note: copying, pasting, and changing the numbers already in the table may work well for you.
  4. Return Scientific Method Quiz
Homework:
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 8, Thursday
  1. Revisit "Design your own Measuring Device" activity from yesterday:
    1. Compare some results and discuss
    2. Why might different groups get varying results? (more than 1 correct answer?)
    3. What are some different possible ways of getting incorrect answers?
    4. Discuss "Estimating Measurements" and how to guarantee that you get the "correct" answer every time. *Hint: This is an area where students often struggle at first. If you want to be successful fast, please give me your full attention for the next couple of minutes and ask if something doesn't make sense. The good news is: There are 3 simple steps that you can use to get it right every time. Write these down:
      1. Carefully look at, and understand the divisions of the device (tool) that you are measuring with.
      2. Carefully look at and decide which two divisions your measurement lies in between (write these down if it helps).
      3. Make sure that you estimate EXACTLY one digit. *Important note: Sometimes this will be the tens column, ones column, tenths column, hundredths column, etc. etc.
  2. Introduce "Estimating Measurements" (reverse side of worksheet)
  3. Practiced metric conversions as a group with demonstrations.
Homework: Metric Conversion and "2-1: Standards of Measurement" Reinforcement and Study Guide (Due next time. Use your notes and purple textbook)
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 7, Wednesday
  1. Scientific Method Quiz Today
    • Put this info on front board: "CH 1 Quiz Today. Please pass forward any extra credit crossword review puzzles with your name on top that you may have completed. When finished with your quiz, please turn it in up front, and work on something quietly, or read, or relax quietly until everyone has had a chance to finish."
  2. Activity: Design Your Own Measuring Device
    1. Introduce procedure (all measurements must have exactly 1 estimated digit and a unit included)
    2. Partners (this is a pairs-only activity)
    3. Once everyone has finished, compare some results and discuss
    4. Why might different groups get varying results? (more than 1 correct answer?)
    5. What are some different possible ways of getting incorrect answers?
    6. Discuss "estimation" and how to guarantee a 100% correct measurement every time
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

Sept 6, Tuesday
Covered CH 2 Notes through slide 15 (The quicker we tackle these, the more time we have to review for tomorrow's quiz, so lets get right to it...)
Discuss Scientific Method Quiz tomorrow!
  • Our first quiz will contain about 12 vocab-matching questions (with a word bank provided)
  • Explain the 2nd half of the quiz: A paragraph-type written response on "Experimental Design from Start to Finish" after we view the Kahoot Review video. "Experimental Design from Start to Finish" (Display Experimental Lab Sheet) is a major part of this first quiz, and I'll tell you exactly where students make the most common mistakes, so listen closely to this if you want to get it right tomorrow. And, no, it's not cheating to write this down:
    • #1 thing: The experiment you are going to be asked to describe is VERY SIMILAR TO THE ONE WE DID, WITH 1 VERY IMPORTANT DIFFERENCE! (*Hint: know the difference between dependent, independent, and controlled variables)
    • Study your 1/2 sheet "Hypothesis Practice" and understand how to correctly state a hypothesis
    • Be able to recall the important steps we all took when participating in the Reaction Time Experiment.
    • Purpose of the "Conclusions" section of the Experimental Lab Sheet? To let the reader know whether or not...?
  • Important Note: This is the first time we are using Kahoot this year. Something new that was added since last year is that teachers can go back and evaluate how you did on a kahoot quizzes, etc. after class. In order to receive a grade for participating in the kahoot, you must enter your real name as your nickname.
  • Extra Practice: Complete the "Nature of Science" concept map worksheet
Homework: Review for Scientific Method Quiz tomorrow!
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

SciMethodWordle.png
SciMethodWordle.png


Sept 2, Friday
Quote of the Day: "No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong." - Einstein
Scientific Method Quiz Wednesday, September 7th
  1. Complete work on the reaction time lab:
  • Share overall reaction time experimental data results and how they were calculated.
  • Overall 61 people had an average reaction time of 0.2966 seconds
  • 28 females had an average reaction time of 0.3025 seconds and 33 males had an average reaction time of 0.2916 seconds.
  • Explain how to complete the "experiment" and "conclusion" sections of lab sheet for full credit.
    • While reading your "Experiment / Procedure" section, I will ask myself, "Could a random stranger follow these directions to repeat the process? Remember: Who was tested and why? EXACTLY how was this done step-by-step? Include what materials / resources were used. Explain the dependent, independent, and controlled variables. Discuss if any unreliable or inconsistent data was omitted and why. How was the data analyzed?
    • "Conclusions" section should explain the data and logical reasoning as to why the data either supports or rejects the hypothesis being tested. Discuss any possible trends in the data or lack thereof. Remember: data results may support a hypothesis, or reject it, but never prove it true or correct. Finally, you may include problems or issues with the experiment OR new research questions you might now have.
Viewed Lab Safety Video (Flinn DVD 15:00 or YouTube 7:00)
Homework: Completed reaction time lab
S11.A.2.1.3 Use data to make inferences and predictions, or to draw conclusions, demonstrating understanding of experimental limits.
S11.A.2.1.4 Critique the results and conclusions of scientific inquiry for consistency and logic.
S11.A.2.1.5 Communicate results of investigations using multiple representations.
S11.A.2.2.2 Explain how technology (e.g., GPS, spectroscope, scanning electron microscope, pH meter, probe, interface, imaging technology, telescope) is used to extend human abilities and precision.

Sept 1, Thursday (For next time, consider either a. testing reaction time to sight vs. sound b/c the outcome is very interesting, OR b. testing gender, but having students refer back to data that was collected by my students for 6+ years) *2 separate questions/experiments?
"It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data." -Arthur Conan Doyle
Discuss Reaction time experiment :
  • Question: Does gender have an effect on reaction time?
  • Record question and hypothesis (worded as a testable, "If....then" prediction) on Experimental Lab worksheet
  • Use Internet browser SAFARI or Chrome anytime we use a Gizmo
  • Conduct experiment (I will lead groups to the correct website and on how to login)
  • Record relevant data on your paper: group, your average reaction time, standard deviation, and number of extraneous clicks (If you have a standard deviation greater than 0.1 seconds and/or 2+ extra mouse clicks, please REDO THE EXPERIMENT until you do not!).
  • On (Shared Google Doc) OR my computer up front, enter: group you belong to, average reaction time, standard deviation and number of extraneous clicks
  • COLLECT DATA FOR ALL CLASSES
  • Evaluate our class data. Discuss initial thoughts, conclusions, etc.
Extra Time? Tinker with the Schoology online discussion feature, take physical science survey for prior knowledge, etc. Review some of the important online resources for this course found on Schoology, wikispace, etc.
Homework: Bring Experimental Lab worksheet tomorrow
S11.A.1.1.3 Evaluate the appropriateness of research questions (e.g., testable vs. not-testable).
S11.A.2.1.1 Critique the elements of an experimental design (e.g., raising questions, formulating hypotheses, developing procedures, identifying variables, manipulating variables, interpreting data, and drawing conclusions) applicable to a specific experimental design.
S11.A.2.1.2 Critique the elements of the design process (e.g. identify the problem, understand criteria, create solutions, select solution, test/evaluate, communicate results) applicable to a specific technological design.

August 31, Wednesday
Computer Use Rules: Please Handle Carefully, Use Appropriately, and Plug Back into Correct Spot
For Today:
  1. Check and go over practice hypothesis writing
  2. Textbooks: If you want one, sign the clipboard sheet being passed around, take and leave your book at home until the end of the year. Most of our homework sheets will go along with the purple textbook, but you are welcome to sign out a blue one too if you'd like. (the blue book also has complete online access *directions on Schoology)
  3. Viewed Streaming Vid: "Scientific Method" (10:00)
  4. Please use the laptop # assigned to you (for faster login), write your # down, and make sure it gets plugged back in to the correct spot when you're done.
  5. Get logged in using your school network username/password. *Note: an example of the new username convention is 17smithj@nasdkids.org. Also, this year your initial password is your 6 digit student ID # followed by your first and last initials. Example: 123456js for John Smith above
  6. Login to Schoology (found at the top of Northampton's homepage), Open the Physical Science course to see what's available there so far.
  7. Introduce explorelearning.com website and login procedure (username / password info on side board) *write down for future reference.
  8. Extra Time? Tinker with the Schoology online discussion feature, take physical science survey for prior knowledge, etc. Review some of the important online resources for this course found on Schoology, wikispace, etc.
Homework:

August 30, Tuesday
"Patience, persistence and perspiration make an unbeatable combination for success." -Napoleon Hill
For Today:
  1. Collect homework (signed course syllabus slip)
  2. Make sure seating chart is accurate and take attendance
  3. Social Contract: Display Pride, Respect, and Responsibility table. What do these look like in the science classroom? Briefly discuss, share any other ideas, and add your signature to the social contract to be displayed on our Black and Orange bulletin board.
  4. What is Physical Science all about anyway? Covered CH 1 Notes
  5. Viewed Streaming Vid: "Scientific Method" (10:00)
Activity: What is a hypothesis?
  1. Brief review of hypothesis writing
  2. Write your own hypothesis for numbers 1-5
  3. Complete & cover sheet
Homework: Finish hypothesis writing practice if not finished during class

August 29, Monday
  1. Seating: Find a seat where you like, but I will always be observing closely to determine whether I need to make changes based on your ability to focus, work effectively, etc. *Is there anyone who needs to be seated up front who has not found a seat there already?
  2. Welcome Back!
  3. Fire Exit Procedure (Evacuation route and destination when leaving from this room) *Display
  4. Display End-of-the-Day Bus Line Up Map for Kids
  5. Hand out Course Syllabus / Class Expectations and Popsicle Sticks (Please write your name on this)
  6. Interview & Introduce a neighbor:
    1. Take a few minutes to do 2 things: a. Interview at least one person sitting near you (Name, Interests, Hobbies, etc.) and b. Review the Class syllabus
    2. Be ready to very briefly introduce the person you interviewed, and give us one item of importance from the syllabus
    3. As we do this I will construct the tentative seating chart
  7. Display Pride, Respect, and Responsibility table. What do these look like in the classroom? Briefly discuss, share any other ideas, and add your signature to the social contract to be displayed on our Black and Orange bulletin board.
  8. Time Permitting: Class Website and Course Introduction, Year-at-a-Glance
  9. Questions about where your next class is, or anything in general?
Homework: Get syllabus signed for tomorrow. (10 points)

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1A9z5xhlebAFtgsi5Ys14areZ6uD12ayrIe3nqNmwCQU/edit#gid=13205248
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0Bt6RPP2ANIM