Email Mr. McHugh at: mchughc@nasdschools.org


May 29, Tuesday (No Period 8 Today)
Final Exam Review

May 24, Thursday (Double Period 8)
Final Exam Review

May 23, Wednesday
Beaker and Flask Accuracy Lab
  1. Review estimating measurements on overhead transparencies
  2. Introduce lab back at lab stations
  3. Make the first measurement and calculation together

May 22, Tuesday
Electricity Quiz Today
Finished viewing Wiring America

May 21, Monday
CPS Clicker Review on Electricity
Began viewing Wiring America (Modern Marvels) Record 5 good questions or fill-ins
Electricity Quiz Tomorrow

May 18, Friday
Returned and covered CH 18 & 19 Test
Returned previous 2nd semester tests
Students built the "World's Simplest Motor" experimented with generators, etc.

May 17, Thursday
Students completed Circuit Builder Gizmo

May 16, Wednesday
Schedule test make ups
Viewed: Electricity and Magnetism (10:00)
Cover notes on Electricity
Voltage, Current, and Resistance

May 15, Tuesday
CH 18 & 19 Test Today

May 14, Monday
Check and Display CH 18 Study Guide
CH 19 CPS Review
Offered CH 19 Extra Credit Crossword Review Puzzle (due tomorrow)
CH 18 & 19 Test Tomorrow!

May 11, Friday
Checked and covered homework
CPS review of CH 18
Worked on CH 18 Study Guide (due Monday)
CH 18 & 19 Test Tuesday 5/15

May 10, Thursday
Students finished Reflection and Refraction Lab from yesterday
Offered CH 18 Extra Credit Review Puzzle (due Tuesday)
Homework: 19-3 Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow
CH 18 & 19 Test Tuesday 5/15

May 9, Wednesday
Finished CH 19 Notes w/ demos of reflection (laser and mirror), refraction (Beaker and pencil), and diffraction.
Diffraction Animations
Students completed Reflection and Refraction Lab Part 1: Complete Exploration # 1 - 4, 6 & 7 (*Note: Use a clear bulb at Stations 4, 6, & 7 and use curved mirrors @ station 7)
Additional demos available:
  • view an LCD screen under a dissecting microscope (what 3 colors do you see?)
  • filters
  • color wheel
  • optical illusions
CH 18 & 19 Test Tuesday 5/15

May 8, Tuesday (SWPBS Meeting)
Display homework key on overhead
Viewed B.O.P. video on "Color" (25:00) (with question sheet?)
CH 18 & 19 Test Tuesday 5/15

May 7, Monday (Borrow microscope camera)
Intro Demo: View an LCD screen under a microscope (what 3 colors do you see?) Hook up to projector cable on screen
UV Sensitive Solar Bead Experiment:
  1. Read background info on UV sensitive solar beads
  2. Write out first couple steps of Lab sheet together
  3. Conduct lab and complete write up in small groups
Homework: 19-2 Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow. Don't forget about the most recent discussion response!
CH 18 & 19 Test Tuesday 5/15

May 4, Friday
Review topics from yesterday (demos). Students completed the Additive Color Gizmo.

May 3, Thursday
Warning: Some of the demonstrations of optics can cause problems for people with epilepsy, and certain other medical conditions. If you have any of these conditions, OR if do not feel comfortable at any point during these demonstrations, please DO NOT observe / participate in them! Simply tell me, and you can read, work quietly, etc.
Checked and covered homework.
Color (or Colour) Blindness: An Activity
Color Blindness Test
Covered CH 19 Notes slides 25-39 w/ filter and light box demo. (Use filters on projectors and laser)
Strobe Light Demonstrations:
  1. Window Box Fan
  2. Falling Water Droplets
Optical Illusions (Am I seeing things!?)

May 2, Wednesday
Covered notes slides 9-16
Viewed B.O.P. clip on Color & the EM Spectrum (12:20 - 16:00)
Covered CH 19 Notes slides 17-24
Completed the EM Spectrum Diagram together. (Reverse side specific info on wave length and frequency) *Remember: All types of EM waves move at the same speed in a vacuum.
Viewed The Universe: Nebulae (23:00-24:00) 1 min. clip
Homework: 19-1 Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow.

May 1, Tuesday
Quiz Make Ups
There is a famous quote that goes something like, "I hear and I forget, I see and I remember, I do and I understand." Well all I know about yesterday is that we definitely heard, and we will definitely not forget. So the only question which remains is: do we understand?
Covered CH 19 Notes slides 1-8
Viewed E.O.P. streaming video clip on the EM spectrum (6:00 - 14:30) / Return Quiz
Sound Lab: Complete the following on the back of your quiz sheet. Copy Station # and Question before proceeding
Alternate Activity: CH 18 Study Guide

Question
Hypothesis
Explanation of Outcome
Station 1
How does the length of the palm pipe relate to it's frequency and pitch?


Station 2
How does the length of the column of air relate to the frequency and pitch at which it will resonate?


Station 3
How does the length of the tuning fork relate to it's frequency and pitch?


Station 4
What factors seem to influence the frequency and pitch of a wine glass?
*Note: Of the 3 glasses, only 2 of them are identical (test water level w/ these)


Station 5
How does the length of the vibrating guitar string relate to it's frequency and pitch?


Station 6
When strike a tuning fork, does the sound seem to travel better through air, water, or solid?


Homework: Wavelength and Frequency Discussion Response (due Thursday)

April 30, Monday
Have a calculator handy today.
Quiz today on Vocab and Graphing a Wave
How can sound break glass? How does a person's voice compare?
New: Students use Tone Generator and/or Online Tuning Fork (attempt to "tune" your computer to mine or to other sound source; guitar, sound tube, etc.) i.e. Identify the Frequency of the Sound I am Producing. Works well, but use only 1 computer per small group
Viewed E.O.P. streaming vid. Sound & Electromagnetism (17:00)
Homework: Wavelength and Frequency Discussion Response (due Thursday)

April 27, Friday
Checked and covered homework w/ demos (I got much better at playing the resonance tube since yesterday!) We could compare it's sound quality to that of a guitar with the same frequency.
Viewed B.O.P. streaming vid on sound (17:00)
Pitch Pipes Activity as a class?
Quiz Monday on Vocab and Graphing a Wave.

April 26, Thursday
Oscilloscope Demo
Checked and covered homework from Tuesday
Finished CH 18 Notes with guitar and sound tube demos. Animation/Diagram of Wave Interference
Gizmo demo of constructive vs. destructive interference
Homework: Music to Your Ears Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow.
Quiz Monday on Vocab and Graphing a Wave.

April 25, Wednesday
Checked and covered homework. Students completed the Doppler Effect gizmo. Quiz Monday on Vocab and Graphing a Wave.

April 24, Tuesday
Review "Measuring Speed of Light in Microwave" (3:00)
Compressional vs. Transverse wave animation
Covered CH 18 Notes slides 15-27 with demos: explorelearning (longitudinal "compressional" waves), slinky, guitar, tuning fork, Doppler Effect video. (2:00).
Homework: Nature of Sound Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow.

April 23, Monday
Checked and covered the homework. Returned and covered CH 7 Test.
Measuring the Speed of Light in a microwave oven:
  1. Choose a food that melts easily and spread it out on a plate
  2. Remove the microwave turntable and heat the food just until it begins to melt (20-30 sec.)
  3. Make visual observations of the food
  4. Review lab/info worksheet
  5. Perform calculations and answer questions
Homework: Complete lab sheet calculations and questions

April 20, Friday
Covered CH 18 Notes slides 10-14. Students completed Wavelength vs. Frequency activity. On your own: choose an amplitude value from 4 -14 and wavelength value (even number between 4 and 16)
Present some examples of student results in a table on front board.
Homework: "Characteristics of Waves" Reinforcement and Study Guide and "Wavelength vs. Frequency" Graph/Sheet due Mon.

April 19, Thursday
Reviewed: Graphing a Wave
Completed the class activity: How do Transverse Waves Compare?
  1. On your own: choose an amplitude value from 1 - 8 and wavelength value (even number between 4 and 10.)
  2. Draw the graph of your wave on graph paper, label it's properties: Crest, Trough, Wave length, Amplitude, Rest Position of the Medium
  3. Trace each wave onto a transparency (everybody on one overhead) (each person in the group use a different color). Here you don't need to label the waves
  4. Compare your waves in groups of 3 and complete the worksheet table
  5. As a group: Display your transparency
  6. Class identifies who owns each wave for a few groups
Students began Wavelength vs. Frequency activity. On your own: choose an amplitude value from 4 -14 and wavelength value (even number between 4 and 16)

April 18, Wednesday
Brain Pop Cartoon "Waves" (4:00)
Schedule test make-ups. Covered CH 18 Notes slides 1-12. Graph a wave on graph paper, identify and label it's properties.

April 17, Tuesday (SWPBS Meeting)
CH 5 & 7 Test Today

April 16, Monday
Have a calculator handy today.
Checked and displayed the CH 5 & 7 Test Study Guide KEY and discuss test short answer questions

CPS clicker review of CH 5 & 7
CH 5 & 7 Test Tomorrow. Note: I have an all day meeting tomorrow, so please ask any final questions you have before leaving today. Also, you may need the entire period, so please come prepared with pencil, calculator etc. and ready to begin immediately.

April 13, Friday
Checked and covered hwk.
Viewed W, E, & Simple Machines 10 min vid. and Best Rube Goldberg Ever
Began CH 5 & 7 Test Study Guide (due Monday)
Homework: Finish the SG for tomorrow
Offered Extra Credit Review Puzzle (due Tuesday)
CH 5 & 7 Test Tuesday April 17th

April 12, Thursday
Have a calculator handy today
Checked and covered Efficiency Problems
Begin work on IMA problems (back of notes) and Using Machines Reinforcement and Study Guide
Offered Extra Credit Review Puzzle (due Tuesday)
Homework: Using Machines Reinforcement and Study Guide (both due tomorrow)
CH 5 & 7 Test Tuesday April 17th

April 11, Wednesday
Have a calculator handy today
Checked and covered homework.
Demos of solving for efficiency (Collect student work on blank paper for class participation credit):
  1. Inclined plane with varying slopes
  2. Various Levers
  3. Wheel and axle
Homework: Finish Efficiency Problems. More Math!? discussion response due Tomorrow
CH 5 & 7 Test Tuesday April 17th

April 10, Tuesday
Eureka on wheel & axle and inclined plane (9 min. total)
Finish CH 5&7 Notes (12 slides) (with force sensor demo of wheel and axle?)
Homework: The Simple Machines Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow. More Math!? discussion response due Thursday
CH 5 & 7 Test Tuesday April 17th

April 4, Wednesday
Finished viewing Extreme Free Fall DVD (12 min.) followed by clips: Real Life Superman (3:20) Wingsuit Base Project (1:35)
Landing without a Parachute!? (3:00) Jeb Corliss (Man vs. Rock @ 120 mph) Jeb Corlis ("Never give up")
Current wing suit distance world record
Complete the Pulley Gizmo (Don't forget to share the document to me)
Homework: Finish Pulley gizmo document and share it to me: mchughc@nasdschools.org

April 3, Tuesday
Complete the Pulley Gizmo (Don't forget to share the document to me)

April 2, Monday
Viewed Eureka vid. on pulleys
Covered notes slides 36-41 with pulley demos of Ideal M.A. vs. Actual M.A. (Record Force Data from Logger Pro)
Complete pulley gizmo on www.explorelearning.com
  1. Log into your https://sso.nasdschools.org/login account and create a new Word document (1 document per group of 2 kids)
  2. Make sure to rename the document to include you and your partner's last names
  3. Click "Share" and enter my email address: mchughc@nasdschools.org
  4. Answer gizmo questions, create a data table, etc. (Note: change will be saved automatically)

March 30, Friday (Streamline next time)
Finished inclined plane lab. (#12-15 on the side board) and discussion forum response (Basically the same concept!)

March 29, Thursday
Move to group you worked with on the pulley lab -------> Demo and finish pulley lab. (Collect)
View Eureka cartoon on Mechanical Advantage & Friction 1st (Pay close attention as today's lab deals with this, so does the next discussion question, and there is a future test question on the difference between Ideal Mechanical Advantage and Actual Mechanical Advantage with respect to levers and inclined planes.)
Inclined Plane Lab w/ spring scales. Intro, perform, discuss.
  • Answer the following questions at the end of inclined plane lab (you don't need to copy the questions):
12. Calculate the I.M.A. of a 1st Class Lever with a 40 cm effort arm and a 10 cm resistance arm.
13. Calculate the I.M.A. of an inclined plane with a 40 cm slope length and 10 cm slope height.
14. Now setup a 1st class lever and inclined plane with the specifications described in #12. & 13. and determine the A.M.A. of each machine by using the force sensor to the lift the block. Note: 2 purple books + 1 blue book = 10 cm slope height
15. Explain why the A.M.A. of the 1st class lever is (or at least why it should be) greater than that of the inclined plane.
Homework: Discussion forum question: Comparing I.M.A. and MA (A.M.A.)

March 28, Wednesday
Meeting at admin. (all day) Extreme Free fall DVD + Questions Sheet

March 27, Tuesday
  1. Review 2nd class lever discussion response and the 3 classes of levers. Remember, "F.R.E. go in the middle of 1.2.3." (Where F = Fulcrum, R = Resistance Force, and E = Effort Force)
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  1. Pulley Lab w/ force sensors or spring scales. *Many people refer to a single fixed pulley wheel as a "flexible" 1st class lever
  2. Discuss Lab & collect sheets
Homework: Discussion forum question: Comparing I.M.A. and MA (A.M.A.).

March 26, Monday
Students began work on the Lever Gizmo
Homework: Finish gizmo and do discussion response

March 22, Thursday
Viewed Eureka on Mechanical Advantage
Reintroduced and finished Lever Lab activity
Complete discussion response for this week

March 21, Wednesday
Homework: Discussion forum question (due Tomorrow): Explain how to solve for the Ideal mechanical advantage of a lever and why the Ideal mechanical advantage of a 2nd class lever is always greater than 1
From yesterday and important in the future:
  1. Ideal Mechanical Advantage (IMA) = effort distance / resistance distance
    • Has no units
    • Tells us how many times a machine should multiply our effort force assuming NO FRICTION
  2. Actual Mechanical Advantage (same as MA) = resistance force / effort force
    • Also has no units
    • Is an actual measure of how many times a machine has multiplied your effort force (Takes all forces into account)
Introduced & Began Lever lab
TIPS:
  1. Make sure you're using the metric side of your meter stick and that the locking screw is on the bottom NOT THE TOP.
  2. READ DIRECTIONS and HANDLE EQUIPMENT WITH CARE.
  3. For example, make sure your fulcrum, resistance force and effort force are at the correct locations according to the directions. (For example, a resistance distance of 40 cm DOES NOT mean the weight needs to be hung @ the 40 cm mark)
  4. Also, make sure your force sensor is at zero before beginning every portion of the lab
    • Part 1. Zero it with the hook facing up (because you'll be pulling down with it)
    • Parts 2 & 3. Zero it with the hook facing down (because you'll be lifting up with it)

March 20, Tuesday
Checked and covered HWK
Demos of leverage: 1. Can you lift a person with 1 finger? 2. When doing standard push ups, your body is effectively a _ class lever.
Work and Power streaming vid. (18:00) (Question sheets collected)
Homework: Discussion forum question (due Thursday): Explain how to solve for the Ideal mechanical advantage of a lever and why the Ideal mechanical advantage of a 2nd class lever is always greater than 1

March 19, Monday
Covered the CH 5&7 Notes slides 19-27 with prybar demo. Covered slides 28-30 (M.A.) Covered slides 31-36 (Levers) with w/ lever hooked up to a spring scale demo.
Viewed eureka cartoon on Levers.
Students completed Why we use Machines Reinforcement and Study Guide (due tomorrow; Use purple textbook pgs. 180-185)
Homework: Discussion forum question (due Thursday): Explain how to solve for the Ideal mechanical advantage of a lever and why the Ideal mechanical advantage of a 2nd class lever is always greater than 1

March 16, Friday
Have a calculator handy today. Work and Power Quiz Today!
Continued CH 5&7 Notes

March 15, Thursday


March 14, Wednesday
Have a calculator handy today.
Energy, Work and Power Quiz Tomorrow. Work and Power Discussion due Tomorrow.
Introduced and completed the Work & Power Lab: Running up a Flight of Stairs.
Procedure & Tips for Lab today:
Before you gather data:
Weight
Mass
Gravity
Is a measure of the Force of gravity between 2 objects.
Is the amount of matter in an object.
Is an invisible force of attraction between all objects.
Expressed in Newtons. (English system uses Pounds)
Expressed in kg
Causes objects to accelerate toward earth at a rate of 10 m/s/s
Weight = mass x gravitational acc.
On earth a mass of 1 kg x 10 m/s/s has a weight of 10 Newtons. (this is equal to 2.25 pounds)


So.....
  • If you know your weight in pounds, divide by 2.25 pounds/kg to find your mass (this never changes wherever you go in the universe). Then multiply by 10 m/s/s to determine your weight in Newtons here in earth. (this would change on the moon)
  • If not, measure your mass in kg on the scale and multiply by 10 m/s/s to convert to a weight in (N)
  • The vertical distance you will move up our flight of stairs = _ meters (big open stair well; lets double check though)
  • I need 1 volunteer to help me time people from the landing
  • While climbing the stairs, stay to the inside! While going back down, stay against the wall!
After you gather data:
  • Work (Joules) = Force (Newtons) X distance (meters)
  • Power (Watts) = Work (Joules) / time (seconds)

March 13, Tuesday
Have a calculator handy today.
Collected remaining lab sheets from yesterday (discuss)
Looked at a sample GPE and KE problem (you'll see something like this on the quiz Thursday)
Returned and covered the CH 4 Test
Intro lab for tomorrow or do discussion response (time permitting)
Energy, Work and Power Quiz Thursday
Work and Power Discussion due Thursday

March 12, Monday
Have a calculator handy today.
Checked and covered the homework
Introduced and completed the work and power lab
Procedure & Tips for Lab today:
  • Weight is a force expressed in Newtons. Weight = mass (kg) X gravity (10 m/s/s)
  • Most of our spring scales display mass in grams and force in Newtons. Digital force sensors express force in Newtons, BUT BOTH MUST BE PROPERLY ZEROED BEFORE USING!
  • Your goal during this lab is to compare the work needed to lift, then slide a small book vs. the work needed to lift, then slide a large book.
  • Work (Joules) = Force (Newtons) X distance (meters)
  • Power (Watts) = Work (Joules) / time (seconds)
Energy, Work and Power Quiz Thursday
Work and Power Discussion due Thursday

March 9, Friday
Checked and covered homework.
How much G.P.E. does a penny have?....What info would you need to know?
Myth Busters: Death by Falling Penny (Netflix Collection 1 Episode 4 15:00 + question sheet) OR (4:00 version)
Covered CH 5&7 Notes through "Power." (Demo of lifting a known mass)
Homework: Work and Power Problems sheet 1 with hints to problems 1-4.

March 8, Thursday
Students completed the Gravitational Potential Energy Gizmo.
Homework: "CH 5 "" Reinforcement and Study Guide & G.P.E. gizmo

March 7, Wednesday
New Idea: A standard bathroom spring scale, a meter stick, push ups, and the formula Work = F x d
Schedule test makeups. Covered CH 5&7 Notes through slide 10. Viewed Eureka vids: Work, Kinetic Energy, and Potential Energy (in order)
Finish CH 4 Test
Homework: Forms of Energy discussion response

March 6, Tuesday
Have a calculator handy today. CH 4 Test Today. CH 4 Hidden Message Puzzle.
Homework: Forms of Energy discussion response

March 5, Monday
Have a calculator handy today.
Checked and displayed homework (CH study guide). Any questions on problems, formulas, etc.?
CPS review of CH 4 as a class. CH 4 Test Tomorrow (Extra Credit Puzzle due then)
Homework: Forms of Energy discussion response


March 2, Friday
Have a calculator handy today.
Checked and covered homework
Offered CH 4 crossword review puzzle for extra credit
Finish Momentum Gizmo
Began work on CH 4 study guide
Homework: Finish CH 4 Study Guide for Monday
CH 4 Test Tuesday March 6th

March 1, Thursday
Have a calculator handy today.
Checked and cover homework
Video Clip : Conservation of Momentum from the Int'l. Space Station
Finish remaining chapter notes on momentum
Momentum & Newton's 3rd Law demos: Basketball vs. tennis ball, racket ball, etc.
Introduce momentum problems
Homework: Momentum Problems Sheet
CH 4 Test Tuesday March 6th

February 29, Wednesday
Have a calculator handy today.
Checked / covered homework
Covered CH 4 Notes slides 13-17 w/ swinging mass demo, viewed E.O.P. streaming video 9:20-10:30
Covered notes slides 18-19 w/ Newtonian demonstrator (Good example of 3rd law and Cons. of Momentum)
Viewed B.O.P. video 12:30-16:00
Homework: Action-Reaction worksheet and Projectile Motion discussion response
CH 4 Test Tuesday March 6th

February 28, Tuesday
Checked and covered homework (Use gizmo to demonstrate velocity components)
Students completed the Air Track: Momentum gizmo
Homework: Falling Objects 2nd Practice and Projectile Motion discussion response
CH 4 Test Tuesday March 6th

February 27, Monday
Have a calculator handy today.
Checked and covered homework (Falling Objects #1-5)
Revisit and finish golf range gizmo (as a group)
Notes
  • Falling Time of a horizontal projectile vs. a dropped item? (Remember the Mythbusters 9mm bullet from last week)
  • The math behind projectile motion
    • Horizontal and vertical velocity components are independent of one another!
    • Calculating horizontal and vertical velocity components (Use gizmo to demonstrate velocity components)
    • The maximum height of a projectile
    • The horizontal distance traveled by a projectile
Homework: Finish the Falling Objects problem sheet and Projectile Motion discussion response

February 24, Friday
Demo of dropped ball and horizontally projected ball
Checked and covered homework.
Students completed golf range gizmo
  • The ball will not disappear from the screen (you estimate when it's a hole in one)
  • Try to observe how horizontal and vertical velocities change during different trials (we'll look at the math behind this next time)
Homework: Finish gizmo

February 23, Thursday
Finished notes on falling objects
  • Warm up: Solve for drop time from a 1.5 m height on Earth
  • Compare to drop time and distance info from motion sensor? (use objects w/ little air resistance)
Introduce Projectile Motion with demos:
Covered CH 4 Notes slides 8-12.
Covered notes on Ball thrown upward and projectiles (time permitting)
Homework: Falling Objects Practice Problems #1-5 ( )

February 22, Wednesday
Have a calculator handy today
Quiz Today on Newton's 2nd Law of Motion (F = m x a)
Notes:
  • A ball is dropped from a tower, how far does it travel after each second?
  • Compare to when a ball is thrown straight down from a tower
    • rearrange for total drop time
    • Compare to drop time and distance info from motion sensor? (use object w/ little air resistance)
Homework:Discussion post "Forces on Falling Objects" due Tomorrow

February 21, Tuesday
Announcement: Please turn in any "i" work by tomorrow. I'll be issuing progress reports soon.
Checked and covered the homework / Viewed Youtube vid on Peregrin Falcon. (5:00) Pond Swooping (4:00)
Review discussion post "Newton's 2nd Law" and 2nd Law problems for quiz tomorrow (as needed)
Explorelearning Free Fall Tower Gizmo (as a group? small groups?)
Homework: Quiz tomorrow on Falling Objects, Terminal Velocity, Newton's 2nd Law of Motion (F = m x a), etc.
Discussion post "Forces on Falling Objects" due Thursday

February 16, Thursday
Recap on Falling Objects Lab (demo up front)
Today's questions (to add to your lab sheet or on separate paper):
  1. How does the number of falling coffee filters influence terminal velocity? (Explain with data from Logger Pro; repeat trials several times if necessary)
    • As a class, form a hypothesis (state as a testable prediction). Identify the dependent, independent and controlled variables and explain how we can test this hypothesis.
  2. With our lab setup (approx. 1.5 m drop height), how many coffee filters can you drop together until they no longer reach terminal velocity? (Explain how you can tell from the graph and data; repeat trials several times if necessary)
*Important: Try to keep the coffee filters packed close together (like when you 1st get the out of the package)
Review and collect lab (time permitting)
Homework: "CH 4 "Accelerated Motion" Reinforcement and Study Guide

February 15, Wednesday
Terminal Velocity of Falling Objects w/ Vernier
Homework: Discussion posts "Newton's 2nd Law" due Tomorrow

February 14, Tuesday
Checked and covered homework.
Returned and covered the CH 3 Test
Demo: How many people have ever wanted to throw something at a teacher's face?
Covered CH 4 Notes thru slide 7 w/ air res. demos (balloon, falling paper, book, objects of varying mass)
Introduce tomorrow's lab: Falling Objects (time permitting)
  • Observe and graph objects dropped below a suspended motion sensor
Homework: Discussion posts "Newton's 2nd Law" due Thursday

February 13, Monday
Have a calculator handy today.
Viewed Eureka on Newton's 2nd Law of Motion
Covered CH 4 Notes thru slide 5
Demonstration: baseball bat vs. basketball / bowling ball and baseball bat vs. baseball / tennis ball
Worked Newton's 2nd Law of Motion worksheet as a class
Homework: Newton's 2nd Law practice problems Discussion posts "Newton's 2nd Law" due Thursday

February 10, Friday
B.O.P. streaming video Exploring Gravity. (16:00)
Newton's 2nd Law Gizmo (as a class?)

February 9, Thursday
Have a calculator handy today. CH 3 Test Today! Collect extra credit review puzzles.
Homework: Discussion post "Weight vs. Mass" due today

February 8, Wednesday
Have a calculator handy today.
Complete/Collect remaining weight lab sheets from yesterday (if you're missing data, get it from a neighbor)
Discuss test content and format. Be prepared for short answer questions on: inertia, friction, comparing weight and mass, and comparing distance-time and velocity-time graphs.
CPS review of CH 3 as a class.
CH 3 Test Tomorrow; extra credit review puzzle due then

February 7, Tuesday (Setup laptop @ each station)
CH 3 Extra Credit Review Puzzle offered (due Thursday)
Checked and displayed homework.
Weight vs. mass lab (do #1 together):
  1. Label the following items in order on your sheet:
    1. 100 g mass
    2. paper clip
    3. padlock
    4. copper cube
    5. aluminum cube
    6. fork
    7. tongs
    8. friction block
  2. Find mass of sample in grams (Make sure riders of balance are locked in place. Hopefully this will lead to "accuracy of measurements." How?)
  3. Convert to kg (move decimal 3 to the left; all items should have 4 digits after the decimal)
  4. Convert to weight in Newtons (multiply mass in kg times 10 m/s/s)
  5. Hold force sensor vertically (with hook down) and zero it
  6. Measure the weight of each item using the digital force sensor
  7. Pass the object on to the next group (Hopefully this will lead to "precision of measurements." Why?)
  8. Answer lab questions, but change #2 to read, "Compare the calculated weights to those measured using the force sensor. Explain any visible trends and possible reasons for any differences."
Homework: Weight Lab sheets (and don't forget about discussion response due Thursday)
CH 3 Test Thursday

February 6, Monday
Display homework key
Students completed weight vs. mass gizmo (Use Safari browser; go to explorelearning.com)
  • Use balance to determine mass and spring scale to determine weight
  • PUT MOUSE ICON DIRECTLY ON SCALE FOR EXACT READING
  • Express mass of objects in kg! (this is crucial when using the W = m x g formula)
  • For example: 3 kg + 500 g = 3.5 kg while 3 kg + 50 g = 3.05 kg
Homework: CH 3 Study Guide & (weight and mass gizmo if not finished in class)
Weight vs. Mass discussion response due Thursday
CH 3 Test Thursday

February 3, Friday
Eureka on gravity & Eureka on weight vs. mass (9:00)
Covered remaining CH 3 Notes. (100 g mass = 1 N of weight demo).
Comparing our mass and weight on a scale. Calculate weight in force units of Newtons using the formula.
B.O.P. streaming video Exploring Gravity. (16:00)
Introduce and begin Homework: Mass and Weight problems

February 2, Thursday
Quick review, then finish friction lab from yesterday, answer questions, turn in lab sheet. Aim for consistent data!
Extension Activity: If you've already finished the lab, perform one or more of the extension activity ideas at the bottom of your data sheet:
  1. Write out the question you're investigating on paper
  2. Write your own hypothesis (as a testable prediction)
  3. Conduct your own trials recording any relevant data and observations
  4. Write a short conclusion as to whether the data supports or rejects your hypothesis and turn it in with your lab.


February 1, Wednesday
Friction Lab w/ Vernier Force Sensors:
  1. Briefly show setup up front, explain variables being tested, and brief demo of how to determine force needed to pull block:
    • Open program, experiment 19, zero force sensor, Pull slow and steady (sounds easy, but may be....difficult?.....impossible?), then collect data.
  2. Form groups and get Logger Pro opened on a laptop.
Homework: Inertia discussion response due Tomorrow
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

January 31, Tuesday
Make a CD Hovercraft (part 1)
  • Write your names on blank CD w/ permanent marker
  • Carefully super glue the valve cap to the CD
  • Place on back counter to dry
Students completed the Fan Cart / Roller Coaster Gizmo. (Cross out #4 and #8 and answer questions directly on your worksheet. DO NOT create & print the Word doc lab report)
Homework: Finish gizmo and do inertia discussion response by Thursday
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

January 30, Monday
View short vid: Toy CD Hovercraft (I have all of the materials except the plastic bottle caps with valves. (Please bring in as many as you can find tomorrow)
Continue CH 3 Notes 16-21:
  • It's always fun to start out with a cartoon!: Eureka on inertia
  • Balanced vs. unbalanced forces (Fan cart gizmo, Skateboard, and R.C. heli)
  • Inertia (Skateboard & garbage can base demo, and why all objects really want to behave like an air hockey puck)
    • How many people have ever wanted to hit a teacher with a baseball bat? (Today you might just get the chance!)
  • Friction (sliding notebook paper vs. sand paper w/ and w/ out pressure)
(Time permitting? Begin discussion response)
Homework: Bring in bottle caps. Inertia discussion response due Thursday
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

January 27, Friday
View short vid: Toy CD Hovercraft (I have all of the materials except the plastic bottle caps with valves. (Please bring in as many as you can find tomorrow)
Have a calculator handy today.
Acceleration Quiz today - Return Student Work
Finished viewing Forces and Motion streaming video (4:00 - 24:00)
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

January 26, Thursday
View short vid: Toy CD Hovercraft (I have all of the materials except the plastic bottle caps with valves. (Please bring in as many as you can find tomorrow)
Have a calculator handy today.
Acceleration Quiz Tomorrow
Viewed Eureka acceleration part 2 / Check, cover, collect homework.
CPS review of CH 3 so far
Students completed The Car Race graphing worksheet
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

January 25, Wednesday
Checked and covered homework
Introduced and began the Fan Cart Acceleration Gizmo:
  • Demo gizmo, functions, and activity sheet
  • Read through the directions (Instead of copying / pasting graphs, follow the next bullet statement)
  • Identify, Label and Use the graphs on the back side of sheet to answer questions to Part II.
Homework: Acceleration Problems 2 . Acceleration Quiz Friday. Discussion Response (due Tomorrow)
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

January 24, Tuesday (New: Some way to observe / calculate the acc. of a falling object)
Speed Quiz Today!
Have a calculator handy today. Viewed acceleration video clip demos. Covered CH 3 Notes thru slide 14. Returned to earlier clips to solve for acceleration. Introduced and began Acceleration Problems.
Homework: Finish Acceleration Problems & Discussion Response (due Thursday)
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

January 23, Monday
Checked and covered homework / Collect Gizmo from Friday
Discussed Tomorrow's quiz. Speed Quiz Tomorrow.
Test motion sensors (compare distance vs. time and velocity vs. time graphs) Place motion sensor free and clear.
On a blank sheet of lined paper:
  1. Trial 1: student walking at a slow, constant speed away from the motion sensor.
  2. Draw a simple sketch of a distance vs. time and a velocity vs. time graph from the screen up front (label axes)
  3. Explain the differences between these types of graphs. What is each one showing?
  4. Predict: sketch what you think the graphs will look like when a student accelerates away form the sensor.
  5. Now sketch what the graphs actually do look like
  6. Predict: Sketch how you think the graphs will look when a student walks TOWARD the motion sensor.
  7. Sketch what the graphs look like when someone does walk toward the sensor. Were you correct? (Explain)
  8. Any other ideas?
  9. Collect
Homework: Discussion Response (due Thursday)
S11.A.2.2.2 Explain how technology (e.g., GPS, spectroscope, scanning electron microscope, pH meter, probe, interface, imaging technology, telescope) is used to extend human abilities and precision.
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

January 20, Friday
Checked and covered homework
Students began the Distance vs. Time graph Gizmo. (Cross out #6 on back and ignore the directions to put all answers in a Word document. Simply answer the questions directly on your worksheet and turn it in when you're done.)
Homework: Graphing Speed and Slithering Speeds and finish Gizmo from today
Speed Quiz Tuesday
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

January 19, Thursday
Have a calculator handy today.
Collected "Calculating Average Speed" from yesterday
Viewed "Frame of Reference" (2:30)
Covered CH 3 Notes thru slide 9
Viewed Forces and Motion streaming video (4 min)
Began Speed Problems together
Homework: Finish Speed Problems
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).

January 18, Wednesday
"Balancing Chemical Equations Gizmo" was the final grade to be entered for 2nd marking period. I did not get it from everyone. I also added your 10 point bonus IF you had a perfect homework record.
Have a calculator handy today.
Wrapped up work on "What does a Million of Something Look Like?" (1,000 cc blocks) (mass vs. # grains of rice activity)
Completed Activity: Calculating Average Speed.
S11.C.3.1.3 Describe the motion of an object using variables (i.e., acceleration, velocity, displacement).
S11.A.3.3.3 Analyze physical patterns of motion to make predictions or draw conclusions

January 12, Thursday SWPBS Meeting Admin Thurs 7:30-2:30
(Double 8th Period, No 9th Period)
Periods 5 & 7: Finish work on Balancing Chemical Reactions Gizmo
Period 8: MidTerm Exam

January 11, Wednesday
Periods 5 & 7: Begin work on Balancing Chemical Reactions Gizmo
Period 8: CPS MidTerm Review

January 10, Tuesday
Periods 5 & 7: Have a calculator handy today. Mid Term Exam (part 2)
  • Make sure to erase any stray marks on the test itself (both before and after you're done)
  • Make sure to write your name and test # on your Scantron answer sheet
  • Today you may work on # 61-120.
  • Turn in your test and answer sheet up front when you're finished
Period 8:
  • CPS MidTerm Review
January 9, Monday
Periods 5 & 7: Have a calculator handy today. Mid Term Exam (part 1)
  • Make sure to erase any stray marks on the test itself (both before and after you're done)
  • Make sure to write your name and test # on your Scantron answer sheet
  • Today you may work on # 1-60.
  • Turn in your test and answer sheet up front when you're finished
Period 8:
  • Finish work on Balancing Chemical Reactions Gizmo
  • Begin/Continue work on midterm exam review puzzles

January 6, Friday
Periods 5 & 7: Have a calculator handy today. We completed CPS clicker midterm exam review as a class.
Period 8: Begin work on Balancing Chemical Reactions Gizmo (We'll review Tuesday & Wednesday)
In order to prepare for the Midterm exam, focus on studying the tests from the 1st half of the year that were returned
Click Here for MidTerm Review Materials
5th & 7th Period MidTerm Exam Mon. 1/9 & Tues. 1/10, 8th Period Exam Thurs. 1/12
End of 2nd Marking Period Fri. 1/20

January 5, Thursday
Have a calculator handy today.
Checked and covered Practice with Significant Figures / Collected remaining puzzles & gizmos
Returned and covered CH 10 Test
Began CPS Review for the final exam (Pd 8 Begin Crossword Review)
In order to prepare for the Midterm exam, focus on studying the tests from the 1st half of the year that were returned
Click Here for MidTerm Review Materials
5th & 7th Period MidTerm Exam Mon. 1/9 & Tues. 1/10, 8th Period Exam Thurs. 1/12
End of 2nd Marking Period Fri. 1/20

January 4, Wednesday
Finish and turn in Oxidation # Puzzles
Homework: Practice with Significant Figures. (due tomorrow)
Click Here for MidTerm Review Materials
5th & 7th Period MidTerm Exam Mon. 1/9 & Tues. 1/10, 8th Period Exam Thurs. 1/12
End of 2nd Marking Period Fri. 1/20

January 3, Tuesday
Collect Ionic Bond Gizmos
Viewed short streaming video clips on Ions (2:00 United Streaming) and Ionic vs. Covalent Bonding (7:00 total)
I introduced and students worked with Oxidation # Puzzles
Returned remaining chapter tests from the first semester (NOTE: these are the best things to use to study for the MidTerm Exam)
Click Here for MidTerm Review Materials
5th & 7th Period MidTerm Exam Mon. 1/9 & Tues. 1/10, 8th Period Exam Thurs. 1/12
End of 2nd Marking Period Fri. 1/20

January 2, Monday
CH 10 Test Makes ups?
Reviewed Periodicity Worksheet page 1 from chapter 10 on overhead. (Consider what must happen to an atom of any element for it to become stable and what that does to the overall charge of the newly formed ion.)
Introduce Functions of and Complete the Ionic Bond Gizmo (Very Short) Safari to www.explorelearning.com
Returned remaining chapter tests from the first semester (NOTE: these are the best things to use to study for the MidTerm Exam)
Homework: Complete Gizmo (if you did not finish in class today)
Click Here for MidTerm Review Materials
5th & 7th Period MidTerm Exam Mon. 1/9 & Tues. 1/10, 8th Period Exam Thurs. 1/12
End of 2nd Marking Period Fri. 1/20

December 23, Friday
Viewed CH 10 Video: "Atomic Structure" and "Halogens" (Question sheet collected for credit)

December 22, Thursday "Assistive Technology" meeting for A.M. Thursday, December 22nd from 10 - 11 a.m. in the conference room
Chapter 10 Test today

December 21, Wednesday
Discuss content, format and short answer questions for the test tomorrow
CPS review of CH 10
CH 10 Test Tomorrow

December 20, Tuesday
Continue & Finish student presentations
View video on Noble Gases (time permitting)
Extra Credit Review Puzzle offered (due Thursday)
CH 10 Test Thursday 12/22

December 19, Monday
Students present group Prezis to the class (supplement with corresponding discovery clips while the next group gets set up):
Alkali Metals, Alkaline Earth Metals, Transition Metals, Nonmetals, Metalloids, Halogens, Noble gases, Lanthanides, and Actinides
  • While other groups are presenting, take a few short notes on the blank sheet provided. (At the minimum, you should get the group characteristics for each) The reverse side of this sheet has questions from accompanying video segments. I will collect and credit both sides once we've learned about all of the different groups.
CH 10 Test Thursday 12/22

December 16, Friday
Checked and cover homework from last night and Wed. night
Continued work on Prezi Project (due date Monday 12/19/11)
(NOTE: some class time will be available this week, but you may need to work outside of class time depending on how quickly your group is progressing)
CH 10 Test Thursday 12/22

December 15, Thursday (Frosh field trip 8:30-11:30)
Homework: CH 10 Study Guide
Continued work on Prezi Project (due date Monday 12/19/11)
(NOTE: some class time will be available this week, but you may need to work outside of class time depending on how quickly your group is progressing)
CH 10 Test Thursday 12/22

December 14, Wednesday
Checked and covered the homework
Introduced the Periodicity Worksheet page 1& 2.
Homework: Periodicity Worksheet (complete both sides) and Discussion response due Tomorrow
Period 5: CH 10 Study Guide due Friday (Vo-tech Field Trip tomorrow; continue Prezi work)
Continued work on Prezi Project (due date Monday 12/19/11)
(NOTE: some class time will be available this week, but you may need to work outside of class time depending on how quickly your group is progressing)
CH 10 Test Thursday 12/22

December 13, Tuesday
Introduced the Nuclear Atom Sheet
Homework: Nuclear Atom Sheet (page 4 only) and Discussion response due Thursday
Continued work on Prezi Project (due date Monday 12/19/11)
Play tutorial video on screen
  • Inserting full-size images from the web
  • Inserting text
  • Moving, rotating and changing the size of things
  • Framing and Paths
(NOTE: some class time will be available this week, but you may need to work outside of class time depending on how quickly your group is progressing)
CH 10 Test Thursday 12/22

December 12, Monday
Continued work on Prezi Project (due date Monday 12/19/11)
Homework: Discussion response due Thursday
(NOTE: some class time will be available this week, but you may need to work outside of class time depending on how quickly your group is progressing)
CH 10 Test Thursday 12/22

December 9, Friday
The "Complete" Periodic Table AND why certain elements have whole number average atomic masses in parentheses:
  • "If the atomic mass of a particular element is shown in parentheses, such as (145) for Promethium (Pm), the atomic mass reflects that of the most stable isotope."
Checked and covered homework / Viewed streaming video clips: alkali metals, (clip 2)
Group Prezi Periodic Table (Group) project work and presentation (Groups of 2, maybe 3; I'll explain) *due date Monday 12/19/11
Grading Criteria Checklist:
  • The presentation is creative (Overall layout, images, text are visually appealing)
  • The presentation includes several effective supporting images
    • 1 image must show or highlight where your group lies on the periodic table
    • 1 image must be an atomic model/diagram of an atom of one of your elements
    • 1 image must be a complete chemical symbol of an atom of one of your elements
      Complete_Chemical_Symbol.png
  • The presentation effectively summarizes the group characteristics (for your particular group of elements)
  • The presentation includes info on specific elements within your group (Similarities and differences)
  • The presentation is focused (remains on the subject)
  • The presentation flows smoothly from one idea to the next
  • The information (text, images, video etc.) is(are) accurate, clearly visible, concise, yet effective (Include a sufficient amount of quality material in en effective manner without drowning the viewer in paragraph after paragraph of text on the screen)

How do I begin?
  • Go here, create a username and password, and write it down.
    • make sure to use your school email address (12doej@konkretekids.org)
    • I'll take you through the steps for beginning
  1. Decide who you will work with and which group of elements you will focus on. (Possible choices include: Alkali Metals, Alkaline Earth Metals, Transition Metals, Nonmetals, Halogens, Noble gases, Lanthanides, Actinides, and Metalloids) We will work in groups small enough to cover each group of elements and obviously each group of elements can only be used once
  2. Familiarize yourself with Prezi. There is a nice tutorial when you begin
  3. Create a new Prezi
  4. Share it with your group
  5. Practice editing, adding text, video, path, etc.
Click here for some amazing sample Prezis

December 8, Thursday
Column 3 Element Quiz Today
Checked / Covered homework sheet
Powerpoint on and students completed the Blank Periodic Table Sheet
Homework: CH 10 "Periodic Table" Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow (You do not need to do word find portion)

December 7, Wednesday
Have a calculator handy in class today
Multiple Power point reviews of column 3 from the "Elements to Know". Column 3 Element Quiz Tomorrow
Average Atomic Mass Lab. (Completed Lab Sheets due Tomorrow)
  1. Gather your m&ms and complete the front (as a class)
  2. Answer the questions (solo or with a neighbor)
  3. Please Note: #7, 8, and 9 on back are designed to make you think, discuss, calculate, etc.
NOTE: If you are having trouble answering all questions, read the info presented here)
Brain Pop Cartoon "Isotopes" (2:11)
Extra Time? ------> Respond to the discussion topic for this week.


December 6, Tuesday
Column 2 Element Quiz Today / Checked and covered homework sheet
Multiple Power point reviews of column 3 from the "Elements to Know". Column 3 Element Quiz Thursday
Viewed Eureka cartoon on electrons

Brain Pop Cartoon "Periodic Table" (4:41)
Finished the CH 10 Notes. (10 slides)
Time Permitting? Begin Viewing: atomic structure, periodic table, etc.
Continued with Periodic Table and Halogens


December 5, Monday
*Announcement: Discussion response (link @ top of this page) must be posted by you no later than Thursday of each week. Again, please make sure it is a complete, correct, significant and grammatically correct response.
Multiple Power point reviews of column 2 from the "Elements to Know". Column 2 Element Quiz Tomorrow
Column 3 Element Quiz Thursday
Continued CH 10 Notes thru slide 30 and viewed Eureka cartoon on electrons.
Introduced 3-3 worksheet on complete chemical symbols.
Homework: Complete 3-3 worksheet for tomorrow
Below is the complete chemical symbol for a 1+ Sodium Ion
Complete_Chemical_Symbol.png

December 2, Friday
Column 1 Element Quiz Today
Completed and submitted the Element Builder Gizmo
If you finish early, try this out!
Multiple Power point reviews of column 2 from the "Elements to Know"
Column 2 Element & Symbol Quiz Tuesday

December 1, Thursday
Return and cover CH 9 Test
Intro and begin Element Builder Gizmo (Please write answers on answer sheet only)
Column 1 element Power point review. Column 1 Element & Symbol Quiz tomorrow


November 30, Wednesday
Covered homework
Column 1 element Power point review. Column 1 Element & Symbol Quiz Friday
Viewed Atomic Structure Prezi
Viewed streaming video on: Simple Science (Atoms), a Better Model?, also Video: Quarks inside the Atom and Video: The Space between Atoms.
Completed Structure of the Atom Coloring activity:
  1. READ the directions and information as you complete the sheet. (Some items are supposed to be a certain color)
  2. Make sure the color of the label matches the color of the item it describes (Neatly)
  3. Use each color only once

Chemical_Formulas.png

November 29, Tuesday
Handed out 3-column list of "Elements to Know" and Periodic Table. Column 1 Element & Symbol Quiz on Friday.
Covered CH 10 Notes thru slide 12 and counting atoms
Viewed Eureka video on Atoms
Brain Pop Cartoon "Atoms" (2:45) and "Atomic Model" (4:09)

Column 1 element Power point review (time permitting)
Homework: Counting Atoms Practice due tomorrow.


November 23, Wednesday (No period 8)
Short streaming vids: Thanksgiving holiday safety 1, 2, 3! (3:00 total)
Probability and the game of Yahtzee!? (A mini lesson and game)
  1. What is probability?
  2. What is the probability of rolling a on 1 roll? of rolling 2 of the same in one roll? (Test it by many consecutive rolls as a large group. Calculate. Explain.)
  3. Why is it "better" to repeat the test many times?
  4. How to play Yahtzee!
  5. Play Yahtzee!
M11.E.4.1.2 Use probability to predict outcomes.

November 23, Tuesday
CH 9 Test Today

November 21, Monday
CH 9 CPS Review
CH 9 Crossword Review (optional, due tomorrow)
CH 9 Test Tomorrow (Prep for short answer on ice cream lab, mixture separation lab, solubility and rate of solution lab, classification of matter flowchart, etc.)

November 18, Friday
Checked and covered CH 9 Study Guide
Ice Cream Lab summary ----> Respond or add to the email I sent when you get a chance.
New Lab!.... Not anymore!
Question: How does the amount of dissolved solids (salinity) of a solution affect the boiling point?
Lab Safety:
  1. Hot plates get really hot! Keep everything away from them that is not supposed to be there. (skin, cables, etc.)
  2. Hot water. Be careful when adding/removing the test tube from the boiling water.
  3. Salt water may be toxic and may irritate skin and eyes.
Directions: Login into your school Gmail account. Open "Salinity and Boiling Point." Follow directions found there.

CH 9 Test Tuesday 11/23. CH 9 Crossword Review (optional, due Tuesday)

November 17, Thursday
Ice Cream Lab (get plastic spoons in Cafe):
  1. Lab Safety:
    • Salts: DO NOT eat them or get them in or around your eyes, etc.
    • DO NOT deviate from verbal and written lab directions (Results in a zero grade and/or loss of lab privilege, disciplinary action)
    • Simply use common sense and common courtesy
  2. Procedure Overview
    1. 0.5 cups whole milk, 1 teaspoon sugar, and a couple drops of vanilla extract into a sealed plastic ziplock.
    2. Remove as much air from the bag as possible
    3. Place inside of another ziplock, again removing as much air as possible
    4. Place 2-3 student ingredient bags into a larger container containing a 2:1 ratio of ice:salt.
    5. Vigorously shake OVER A SINK / LAB TABLE until the mixture becomes frozen
    6. Enjoy!
    7. Make lab area look like it did when you arrived
    8. Begin 1-paragraph lab summary
  3. Assignment 10 points (due tomorrow): On paper, write or type a one paragraph summary (8 points) explaining how the ingredients to make ice cream were frozen inside of the container. Explain "the science" behind this process (please don't just tell me what we did in class.) (Also make sure to cite your sources 2 points)
    • Hint: It involves solutions (solvent and solute particles) and the term "freezing point depression." Also, your purple textbook could be a good place to start.
CH 9 Test Tuesday 11/23

November 16, Wednesday
Solubility Quiz Today
Complete CH 9 Study Guide. (due tomorrow) & Solubility discussion response.
CH 9 Test Tuesday 11/23

November 15, Tuesday
Check and cover solubility graph practice
Demo: 2 Computers + Temperature Probes + Test Tubes w/ Ingredients for Ice Cream
  1. In Regular Ice Water Bath
  2. In Salty Ice Water Bath
  3. Compare Graphs of Temperature vs. Time and the Resulting Mixtures
  4. Essential Question: What is Freezing Point Depression?
CPS Review of solubility graph questions (as a class)
Solubility Quiz Tomorrow! (Be able to graph solubility data, and interpret the graph)
Solubility discussion response.
CH 9 Test Tuesday 11/23

November 14, Monday
I introduced solubility graphs and lead the class through graphing the data for An Investigation in Solubility 1
Answer questions together.
Homework: Set up and graph the data for An Investigation in Solubility 2. NOTE:You may use graphing software if you like. i.e. Excel, but you must still answer the questions about the graph/data. Solubility discussion response.
Solubility Quiz Wednesday 11/16 (Be able to graph solubility data, and interpret the graph)
S11.C.1.1.6 Describe factors that influence the frequency of collisions during chemical reactions that might affect the reaction rates (e.g., surface area, concentration, catalyst, temperature).
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

November 11, Friday
Finished the Solubility and rate of solution lab
Viewed Solubility Video (13:22)
S11.C.1.1.6 Describe factors that influence the frequency of collisions during chemical reactions that might affect the reaction rates (e.g., surface area, concentration, catalyst, temperature).
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

November 10, Thursday
Finished CH 9 Notes on Solutions and solubility. (3 slides)
Demonstration of surface area:
  1. Overheads:Gizmo: Prisms and Cylinders: Activity A
    1. What is the total surface area of 1 long 10 mL block
    2. What is the total surface area of the same block cut up into 10 pieces of equal volume?

Students began the Solubility and rate of solution lab
Homework: "Classification of Matter Flowchart" on Google Docs due tomorrow and mixture discussion response
S11.C.1.1.6 Describe factors that influence the frequency of collisions during chemical reactions that might affect the reaction rates (e.g., surface area, concentration, catalyst, temperature).
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

November 9, Wednesday
Announcement: Don't forget about the weekly discussion response due Thursday each week and to finish the "Classification of Matter Flowchart" on Google Docs
Checked and covered homework.
Students completed the Mixture Separation Lab.
Mixture Separation Lab:
  1. Safety concerns: Handle glassware and materials carefully.
  2. Read and follow directions carefully. (When in doubt, ask)
  3. Please leave lab station the way you found it.
  4. Teacher identification of materials and recovery station.
  5. Make sure your beakers are clean and dry before beginning each part of the lab
Homework: "Classification of Matter Flowchart" on Google Docs due Friday. (I do not have laptops readily available for now)
S11.A.3.3 Compare and analyze repeated processes or recurring elements in patterns.
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

November 8, Tuesday
Announcement: Don't forget about the weekly discussion response due Thursday each week. If you did not receive credit for a response last week, you either a. did not respond or b. your response was not complete. This will be worth 15 points every week. Full credit (15 points) will be based on 3 criteria: 1. Completeness of your response (A few sentences should be sufficient), 2. Significance of contribution (Does your response address my initial post or does it constructively build on the response of someone else?), 3. Reasonably correct spelling and grammar. Also, computers will not always be available every day during this class.

Checked and covered the concept map
  1. Introduced and began Classification of Matter Samples worksheet as a class. (For each section, there are specific questions to ask about each sample)
  2. Finished the Compounds and Mixtures Coloring activity from last week.
Homework: CH 9 "Composition of Matter" Reinforcement and Study Guide and any other unfinished items above. Also, "Classification of Matter Flowchart" on Google Docs due Friday. (I do not have laptops readily available for now)
S11.A.3.3 Compare and analyze repeated processes or recurring elements in patterns.
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

November 7, Monday
Begin work on Classification of matter flowchart activity (pairs if you want)
  1. Login to your Google Docs account

  2. Open the "Classification of Matter" Drawing. Click: "Make a Copy," "Rename" this file as (YourLastNameAssignmentTitle) and "Share" back to mchughc@nasdschools.org as a "Collaborator."

Complete the activity by:


    1. Correctly placing the tags in their respective locations
    2. Inserting at least 1 small & clearly visible image example for each of the bottom classes of matter (6 total)
    3. Insert a caption for each image (if it is not obvious what the image is showing) For example, it may not be obvious to the viewer that your small image is showing a block of iron whereas a different image clearly shows a bag of chex mix.
  1. *Note: the entire map must be clear and visible. Your changes should be saved automatically, but you will want to make sure your final changes are saved at the end, and that you have shared the drawing to me as a "Collaborator."

Homework: Complete the CH 9 Concept Map (on back of notes page 3)

S11.A.3.3 Compare and analyze repeated processes or recurring elements in patterns.
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

November 4, Friday
Viewed streaming video "Mixtures and Solutions" (17:00)
Log into your Google account, open the document "Physical vs. Chemical Properties/Changes Questions" and follow the directions found there.
Finished Compounds and mixtures coloring
Homework: Make sure your presentation slide and multiple choice document question are completed today
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

November 3, Thursday
Handed out remaining CH 9 Notes and finished slides on"mixtures" and "pure substances."

Brain Pop Cartoon "Compounds and Mixtures" (2:00)
Students began the Compounds and Mixtures Coloring activity:
  1. READ the directions and information as you complete the sheet. (Some items are supposed to be a certain color)
  2. Make sure the color of the label matches the color of the item it describes
  3. Use each color only once
Homework: "Physical Properties vs. Chemical Properties" presentation slides due tomorrow
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

November 2, Wednesday (Next Time? When we say something like, "Ca is good for our bones and teeth." do we mean the pure element, some compound containing Ca, or what!? And what's the difference(s)?)
Finish "Volume of this Room" activity and award prizes
Demo how to login to student Google accounts, open, and edit documents
Login to your Google accounts:
  1. Click on "Create New" then "Presentation."
  2. Search the Internet for school appropriate descriptions of physical and chemical properties and changes. Add examples of each, a supporting image, and a short description to your slides. (To get an idea of what I'm looking for, check out the bottom of this page) *Note: You can not use my exact examplesNow open the class document "Physical Properties vs. Chemical Properties"
    • Essentially, I want you to explain what physical and chemical properties are, provide an example of each, and also describe the difference between physical and chemical changes (again citing an example with images).

  3. Copy and paste your slides in the correct spot within this class presentation
  4. Now constructively comment on peer slides. i.e. are they good and correct examples of physical and chemical properties or, if not, how could they be corrected?
Homework: Respond to discussion topic "Physical vs. Chemical Properties and Changes" (due Tomorrow)
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter.

November 1, Tuesday
Checked and covered homework / Viewed Brain Pop Cartoon "Conservation of Mass" (3:13)
Returned and covered the CH 8 Test
Revisit measuring volume with accuracy and precision lab:
  1. Find a partner and get 1/2 sheet of paper.
  2. Look at the cubic meter and predict how many of them would fit in this room (ignoring counters, desks, lab tables and anything else that takes up space)
  3. Write down your initial prediction
  4. Now take the measurements you need to calculate the volume of this room in cubic meters (Note: there is more than one way to do this correctly)
  5. Calculate the volume of this classroom in cubic meters. Remember: Always estimate 1 digit when measuring, and always limit the precision of your calculated answer to the least precise value within your calculation.
  6. Was your calculated answer close to prediction? Explain.

October 31, Monday (Next Time? New "Rxn. in a Bag" lab activity)
Brain Pop Cartoon "Property Changes" (2:27)
Covered CH 9 Notes through slide 12.
Viewed Short Video on Props & Changes (3:00)
Conservation of Mass Demo Alka Seltzer (citric acid, naHCO3 and aspirin) Get more Alka Seltzer!
NaHCO3 + H3O+ (from above) --------- Na+ + H2O + CO2(g) The bubbling is because of carbon dioxide gas formed
  1. Place 30 mL of water into a 100 mL graduated cylinder
  2. Break and place antacid tablets into a balloon
  3. Wrap balloon around rim of graduate
  4. Drop antacid into water and immediately place graduate onto a digital balance. (Observe mass)
  5. Repeat experiment without the balloon
Respond to discussion topic "Physical vs. Chemical Properties and Changes" (due Thursday)
Homework: Chemical and Phys. Props and Changes Sheet and discussion response if not finished in class
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter

October 27, Thursday (Pd. 8 extended to 2 PM)
Viewed Cosmic Voyage

October 26, Wednesday
Covered CH 9 Notes through slide 6.
Introduce Class Discussion Forum: Beginning this week, there is a new course discussion requirement. When you visit the class website (Class Summaries Page), you will find a "discussion" tab at the top. You can also set it up so that you automatically receive an email whenever a new discussion topic has been posted. Your job is to respond to the discussion post by answering my initial questions or following the directions there. You may also receive credit by "constructively and appropriately" responding to a peer response. For example, if a peer responds to my initial questions and/or asks a new question, you can attempt to research, answer their question, or otherwise respond "constructively and appropriately." The good news is that most of these topics will end up becoming similar to short answer questions you will see on the test for that respective chapter. You will also receive a grade for correctly responding to the discussion each week. (Note: After the due date, the discussion will be locked. You may only receive credit by responding by the due date assigned.) Full credit (15 points) will be based on 3 criteria: 1. Completeness of your response (A few sentences should be sufficient), 2. Significance of contribution (Does your response address my initial post or does it constructively build on the response of someone else?), 3. Reasonably correct spelling and grammar. On average, there will be about 3 discussion topics per chapter. Again, these will be similar, if not identical, to the short answer test questions for that chapter.
S11.C.1.1 Explain the relationship between the structure and properties of matter

October 25, Tuesday
CH 8 Test Today
After the test....
Setup wikispaces accounts:
  • Go to wikispaces.com
  • Create a new account username: YourLastName2011 password: ? (But make sure you write it down!)
  • You DO NOT need to create your own wiki
  • You DO need to go to nahsphysicalscience.wikispaces.com and click "Join" and "Request Membership"
  • Once I approve your membership, you will then be able to respond to the first discussion

October 24, Monday
Check and display homework key
Covered the test content and format. Please prepare for short answer questions on: 1. What is really happening during the can crush demonstration? 2. Temperature vs. Time graph during phase changes. 3. Explain what happens to the mass and volume of ice during the melting process.
CPS review of CH 8 as a class
CH8 Crossword Review due for extra credit tomorrow
CH 8 Test Tomorrow

October 21, Friday
The end of the first marking period is November 4th. Submit incomplete "i" work NOW and STAY CAUGHT UP!
Check this out!
Revisit Gas Lab Problems
Inquiry Activity (as a class?): Egg in the Bottle: Safety Concern: Hot Plates and Handle Glassware Carefully
  1. Carefully peel 1 hard boiled egg
  2. Put a small piece of burning paper in a flask
  3. Immediately place the egg on top of the flask
  4. Consider, discuss, proceed to get the egg out in one piece using your knowledge of gas laws
  5. If you have questions about whether or not you should try a certain approach, ASK FIRST!
Determining the distance and midpoint between 2 points on a Temperature vs. Time Graph
Homework: CH 8 Study Guide
Extra Credit Review Puzzle due Tuesday
CH 8 Test Tuesday 10/25
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.
S11.C.1.1.5 Predict the behavior of gases through the application of laws (e.g., Boyle’s law, Charles’ law, or ideal gas law).

October 20, Thursday
The end of the first marking period is November 4th. Submit incomplete "i" work NOW and STAY CAUGHT UP!
Collected lab sheets and graphs from yesterday / Showed yet another extra credit opportunity and how you can receive notifications whenever I edit the "Extra Credit" page.
Viewed streaming video on the gas laws.(14:00)
Gas Laws Gizmo (as a class) (Collect)
Introduced and began work on Gas law Problems (Add a decimal at the end of all values on the worksheet).
CH 8 Test Tuesday 10/25

October 19, Wednesday
The end of the first marking period is November 4th. Submit incomplete "i" work NOW and STAY CAUGHT UP!
(Have a Cartesian diver on hand)
Completed the Boyle's Law Lab (with gas pressure sensors):
  • Please handle pressure sensors with great care! They are expensive and it is possible to blow a seal by applying too much pressure to the plunger
  • Follow directions on lab sheet, answer questions on answer sheet, graph data on graph paper
  • Demo of using pressure sensor and saving data points
  • Make sure you set the plunger to 10 mL before connecting it to the gas pressure sensor
Additional dry ice demos? (time permitting)
Homework: Finish Lab and Create a graph of data CH 8 Test Tuesday 10/25
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.
S11.C.1.1.5 Predict the behavior of gases through the application of laws (e.g., Boyle’s law, Charles’ law, or ideal gas law).

October 18, Tuesday
The end of the first marking period is November 4th. Submit incomplete "i" work NOW and STAY CAUGHT UP!
Checked and covered the homework
Dry Ice Lab/Demos:
Safety Concerns: It is extremely dangerous to handle dry ice without proper personal protective equipment.
  1. DO NOT allow dry ice to contact exposed skin
  2. DO NOT remove the dry ice from the lab table without direct permission from your teacher
  3. DO NOT deviate from verbal and written directions in any way whatsoever
Procedure:
  1. Observe the behavior of dry ice and take it's surface temperature. Questions?
  2. Demos: 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 (balloon), 7, and 8 as a class
  3. Small groups perform demos: 1, 2, 3 and 8 at lab stations using sink, water, thermometer etc.
CH 8 Test Tuesday 10/25
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

October 17, Monday
The end of the first marking period is November 4th. Submit incomplete "i" work NOW and STAY CAUGHT UP! Also, if you have some winter gloves, bring them to class tomorrow for the Dry Ice Lab.
Collected Phase Change Lab and Gizmo.
Checked and covered the homework.
A question was raised recently: Does melting ice raise water level (volume)? What about the mass of the contents before and after melting?
Form a hypothesis as a testable prediction. "As ice melts into water, the volume will _ and the mass will _."
How it can be tested with enough precision. (Demo)
Record the data somewhere in your notebook so we can compare the measurements later this period.
Finished the CH 8 Notes with balloon and Gas Pressure Sensor demonstrations
Take final measurements of melting ice demo. Did mass and/or volume change? If so, how?
Homework: CH 8 Concept Map Phase Diagram and Table (or can we get it them done in class?)
CH 8 Test Tuesday 10/25
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

October 14, Friday
Have a calculator handy in class today.
*Bonus Opportunity! When we take a test, major quiz, etc. all you need to do is simply, correctly write out one of our QuOTDs. (*Note: It can not be the current day's QuOTD)
Reviewing the graph of "Temperature vs. Time" from the Phase Changes Lab:
  • Can you identify melting, melting point, freezing, freezing point, boiling, boiling point, heat of fusion, and heat of vaporization?
Finished the Phase Change Gizmo
Homework: "8-3: Changes in State" Reinforcement and Study Guide and Phase Change Gizmo due Monday
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

October 13, Thursday
Briefly revisiting lab safety...."Not following directions and/or horseplay will result in a zero grade for this lab and possible disciplinary action."
Demo of Phase Change Lab with magnetic stirrer
Introduced and completed pages 1-3 of the Phase Change Gizmo:
  1. Use Safari and login to explorelearning.com with login info on upper-right corner of front board
  2. You may work with one partner for this activity
(NOTE: You should try to get through all questions on page 3. If you start page 3 but don't finish, you may need to redo the whole page again)
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

October 12, Wednesday (Get Ice)
Students completed the Examining Phase Changes Lab using Vernier temperature probes. Lab sheets collected at the end of class or first thing tomorrow if you need more time to answer questions.
Period 5: Assist with computer/lab setup
Period 8: Assist with lab clean up
Key items and safety for the lab today:
  1. Follow all verbal and written directions!
  2. If your computer is uncooperative, immediately inform me and continue lab with a plain, old thermometer
  3. Hot plates are potentially dangerous! The only thing on a hot plate should be a beaker. (Keep chords and everything else out of the way!)
  4. Computers do not like water and water and electricity do not mix! This lab is setup specifically to prevent accidents. Keep your computer away from the hot plates and beakers of water!
  5. Not following directions and/or horseplay will result in a zero grade for this lab and possible disciplinary action.
Take some boiling water from the first group done with the lab, place into a test tube, begin to graph it's temperature, lower the tube into a salty ice water mixture and stir until the test tube water freezes.
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

October 11, Tuesday (Get Ice)
Viewed short streaming videos on liquids, evaporation and condensation (8:00)
Demo: Aluminum Can vs. Atmospheric Pressure
  1. Observe
  2. Hypothesize (Possible explanations?) Illicit responses
  3. Accepted ExplanationCan this happen on a larger scale?
    • What is atmospheric pressure?
    • What is happening at the molecular level during condensation?

Viewed a united streaming video, "Temperature: Measure for Measure." Question sheets collected

October 7, Friday (Get some empty Al cans)

Brain Pop Cartoon "States of Matter" (4:30)
Checked and covered the homework
Returned and covered the CH 1&2 Test
Covered CH 8 Notes through slide 17
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

October 6, Thursday
(Next time offer extra cred. some empty, un-crushed Al cans)
Covered CH 8 Notes through thermal expansion. With Demos:
  1. Equal volume of liquid in various containers
  2. Gas vs. liquid in a syringe
  3. Blow torch demonstrations (Observe, Predict, Discuss)
Eureka video on solids and one on expansion and contraction
Viewed Eureka cartoon on temperature
Homework: "8-1: Matter and Temp" Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow.
S11.C.2.1 Analyze energy sources and transfer of energy, or conversion of energy.

October 5, Wednesday
CH 1&2 Test Today
S11.A.2.1.3 Use data to make inferences and predictions, or to draw conclusions, demonstrating understanding of experimental limits.

October 4, Tuesday
Collected Measuring Temperature Lab
Checked and displayed the chapter study guide key
Discussed tomorrow's test content/format: Vocab matching, multiple choice, problem solving (Show correct formula, # answer with correct significant figures, and unit)
CPS Review of CH 1&2
The CH 1&2 test review puzzle may be completed for extra credit. (By Tomorrow)
CH 1&2 Test Tomorrow!
S11.A.2.2.2 Explain how technology (e.g., GPS, spectroscope, scanning electron microscope, pH meter, probe, interface, imaging technology, telescope) is used to extend human abilities and precision.
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).
M11.A.1.1 Represent and/or use numbers in equivalent forms (e.g., integers, fractions, decimals, percents, square
roots, exponents and scientific notation).

October 3, Monday
QuOTD: "Never demand as a right what you can ask as a favor." -Elanor Roosevelt
New "Extra Credit" page on our class website
Returned and covered Density and Metric Quiz (overhead key)
Brain Pop Cartoon "Temperature" (2:37)
Eureka video on temperature -----> Covered a couple of temperature conversions on overhead. *Please note: a formula itself does not limit the precision of a calculated answer. For example: You use a Celsius thermometer to measure the temperature of boiling water as 100.0 degrees Celsius (4 sig. figs.). You then convert to Fahrenheit using the formula F = 1.8(C) + 32 and your calculated answer is 212 F. You are tempted to write 210 F as your final answer because you are aware of significant figures and the rules for rounding. However, the 1.8 from the formula to convert Celsius to Fahrenheit DOES NOT limit your answer to 2 sig. figs.! "Why the heck not you ask!?" Because in this case 1.8 is not a measurement, it is simply part of a formula that is used for conversion. The rules for sig. figs. and rounding your calculated answer only apply to measurements themselves. This is because there is always some estimation involved in measurement and as we already know, the precision of our measurements is determined by the device we are measuring with.
Finish temperature lab and Temperature conversion sheet (on back)
Homework: Chapter 1&2 Study Guide. CH 1&2 Test Wednesday 10/5
S11.A.2.1.3 Use data to make inferences and predictions, or to draw conclusions, demonstrating understanding of experimental limits.
M11.A.3.1 Apply the order of operations in computation and in problem-solving situations.

September 30, Friday
"It is well to remember that the entire population of the universe, with one trifling exception, is composed of others."
Have a calculator handy in class today.
Covered remaining CH 2 Notes
Introduced and practiced using temperature conversion formulas
Introduced and completed temperature lab activity:
Safety:
  • Please handle glass thermometers carefully. Tell me right away if you break one.
  • Laboratory salts are toxic! DO NOT eat or drink anything in lab and always wear personal protective equipment when necessary
  • Some samples may be hot!
Object Descriptions for Temperature Lab:
  1. Body Temp Under Arm
  2. Ice Water
  3. Ice Water with Salt
  4. 60 Watt Light Bulb Surface (Use great care not to break these)
  5. 40 Watt Light Bulb Surface
  6. Air Temp Near Ceiling
  7. Air Temp Near Floor
At each station, allow the thermometer to acclimate (wait until it is not changing) and estimate your measurement. (Remember on a physical scale with divisions, you should always estimate 1 digit.
After completing your first station, take the thermometer with you to the rest of the stations.
CH 1&2 Test Next Week
S11.A.2.2.2 Explain how technology (e.g., GPS, spectroscope, scanning electron microscope, pH meter, probe, interface, imaging technology, telescope) is used to extend human abilities and precision.
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 29, Thursday
"A committee of one gets things done."
Have a calculator handy in class today.
Discuss questions from Class Density Activity
Metric and Density Quiz Today!
Viewed Eureka cartoons on "Mass" and "Volume & Density" (9:00 total)

September 28, Wednesday
"The greatest mistake you can make in life is to be continually fearing you will make one."
Have a calculator handy in class today.
Check and cover homework
State your own testable prediction"will statement" for each of the questions on back (leave room for answer):
    1. How does the density of an object compare to whether it floats or sinks in water?
    2. Can objects have equal mass and different densities?
    3. Can objects have equal volume and different densities?
    4. Can 2 different sized objects made of the same material have equal density?
Object Descriptions for Density Activity:
    1. Wooden block
    2. Grey slab block
    3. Cloudy block
    4. Cloudy slab
    5. Copper block
    6. Grey block
    7. Can of regular soda
    8. Can of diet soda
  1. Small groups take measurements and calculate the density of the samples with attention to correct significant figures
  2. Share your group data with the class, predict flotation based on density, and test it in the enormous clear water jug
(Please Note: The typical 12 oz. can of soda is labeled as 355 mL liquid volume. However, the aluminum can itself does take up some space (volume). A good estimate for the total volume of the can + soda = 380 mL)
Homework: Answer the questions from the Class Density Activity today
Metric and Density Quiz Tomorrow
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).
S11.A.2.1.3 Use data to make inferences and predictions, or to draw conclusions, demonstrating understanding of experimental limits.
M11.A.3.1 Apply the order of operations in computation and in problem-solving situations.
M11.A.3.2.1 Use estimation to solve problems.

September 27, Tuesday *Meet the Teacher Tonight 6:30-8:30
"The only way to predict the future is to have power to shape the future."
Have a calculator handy in class
Viewed Where the heck to round (Yes again! :) ----> Checked and covered homework
Discussed results of volume lab:
  1. Samples 1-10 become more until you get to #10.
Discussed results of mass lab (particularly stations #6 metal cube & #7 10 mL water)
  1. Rounding and Significant Digits
  2. Calculating the density of Water
Covered density and formulas notes
Homework: Density Problems Sheet
Metric and Density Quiz Thursday 9/28

September 26, Monday
Have a calculator handy in class.
Warm Up: Practice Metric Conversions on board (powerpoint) ----> Return Volume Labs
Finished work on density gizmo:
  1. Complete data table as a class
  2. With your partner, answer questions 3 - 5 (#5 involves solving for density in column 5 of your table)
  3. Answer all remaining questions using your data table
Revisit the volume lab with your graded lab sheet. If you briefly correct those you got wrong, I will grade them again. Remember: Answers may be wrong due to accuracy and/or precision.
Homework: Completed "Measuring Length Skills Practice" and Mass Worksheet
Metric and Density Quiz Thursday 9/28
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).
S11.A.2.1.3 Use data to make inferences and predictions, or to draw conclusions, demonstrating understanding of experimental limits.

September 23, Friday
Finished work on the mass lab
Began work on density gizmo. Metric and Density Quiz next week
  1. Complete the first 4 columns for samples 1-12 (and crowns if you like)
  2. Answer questions 3 - 5 (#5 involves solving for density in column 5 of your table)
  3. Answer all remaining questions using your data table
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 22, Thursday

Quote of the Day: "A li
Checked covered homework
Demo identical volume of water in a graduated cylinder vs. a beaker. Which is more precise and how can you tell?
Demonstration of determining volume by water displacement (block of known volume in water)
Refresher on zeroing the balance and taking a mass measurement
Demos for determining mass by subtracting mass of empty container. (Triple Beam vs. Digital)
Students completed the mass lab. (Attention to accuracy and precision)
Homework:
Object Descriptions for Mass Lab:
  1. Unsharpened #2 pencil
  2. single hole puncher
  3. 100 g mass ?
  4. D battery
  5. large paper clip
  6. metal cube (complete the back side of lab sheet at this station)
  7. 10 mL H2O (just the mass of the water itself)
  8. metal pellets (just the mass of the pellets)
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 21, Wednesday
Quote of the Day: "A little more persistence, a little more effort, and what seemed hopeless failure may turn to glorious success." - Elbert Hubbard
Collect remaining length labs
Complete volume lab
Review ROUNDING the # of DECIMAL PLACES when adding or subtracting vs. # OF SIG. FIGS. when multiplying or dividing (use overhead projector with metric ruler transparency and blocks)
  1. Adding & Subtracting measures made using the same device (precision) length and volume
  2. Adding & Subtracting measures made using a different device (precision) length and volume
  3. Multiplying & Dividing measures made using the same device (precision) area and volume
  4. Multiplying & Dividing measures made using a different device (precision) volume
Viewed Where the heck to round
Homework: Calculating the Number of Significant Figures (Side 2)

September 20, Tuesday
Quote of the Day: "The difference between something good and something great is attention to detail." - Charles R. Swindoll
Have a calculator handy today
Checked and covered homework
Finish collecting data from the "Measuring Length" lab and begin the "Measuring Volume" lab. Lab sheets were collected. (NOTE: See me about making up this lab if you were absent today)
Tips:
  1. Read liquid volume at eye level, from the bottom of the meniscus. (Hold a white paper behind if necessary)
  2. Know what each division is (precision) and ALWAYS make sure the last digit is a CLOSE estimate (accuracy). It may help to underline the estimated digit.
  3. Quick lesson on ROUNDING the # of DECIMAL PLACES when adding or subtracting vs. # OF SIG. FIGS. when multiplying or dividing (use overhead projector with metric ruler transparency and blocks)
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 19, Monday
Quote of the Day: "Fast is fine, but accuracy is everything." - Wyatt Earp
Have a calculator handy today
Covered last 4 slides of Measurement-Precision Notes
Students completed the "Measuring Length" activity and sheets were collected.
Object Descriptions for Length Lab (Please make sure you number these in order on your sheet):
  1. Length of File folder
  2. Length of Index Card
  3. Length of Window Ledge (back window)
  4. Height of Lab table (tall table)
  5. File cabinet height
  6. Width of your desk
  7. Length of 1 single floor tile
  8. Length of Periodic Table
  9. Length of tissue box
Finally, make sure you measure each item using each side of the meter stick and always estimate 1 digit. (36 total measures)
Homework: Determining the Number of Significant Figures (Side 1 only)

S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 16, Friday
Quote of the Day: "Don't aim for success if you want it; just do what you love and believe in, and it will come naturally."
Practiced estimating measurements and conversions on overhead
Students used SAFARI to go to explorelearning.com and begin working on the Triple Beam Balance Gizmo. (pairs)
Return work
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 15, Thursday
Quote of the Day: "In the field of science, the accuracy of the measurement of a quantity is the degree of closeness of that measurement to that quantity's actual (true) value. The precision of a measurement is the degree to which repeated measurements under unchanged conditions show the same results." - Wikipedia
Nice Accuracy vs. Precision Explanation (6:00) and checked / covered homework
Practiced estimating measurements and conversions on overhead
Viewed streaming video on measurement (17:00-37:00)
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 14, Wednesday
Quote of the Day: "Be precise. A lack of precision is dangerous when the margin of error is small" - Donald Rumsfeld
The independent variable answers the question "What do I change?"
The dependent variable answers the question "What do I observe?"
The controlled variable answers the question "What do I keep the same?"
Continued CH 2 notes through slide 25 "Sig. Figs."
Covered Measurement-Precision Notes through "Sig. Figs."
Practiced metric conversions as a group with demonstrations.
Homework: Metric Conversion and "2-1: Standards of Measurement" Reinforcement and Study Guide due tomorrow
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

September 13, Tuesday
Quote of the Day: "There are two possible outcomes: if the result confirms the hypothesis, then you've made a measurement. If the result is contrary to the hypothesis, then you've made a discovery." - Enrico Fermi
Scientific Method Quiz Today
Covered CH 2 Notes through slide 15.
S11.A.2.2.1 Evaluate appropriate methods, instruments, and scale for precise quantitative and qualitative observations (e.g., to compare properties of materials, water quality).

Sept 12, Monday
Quote of the Day: "An essential aspect of creativity is not being afraid to fail. - Edwin Land
Discuss Scientific Method Quiz tomorrow!
  • Warm up: Complete the "Nature of Science" concept map. Cover.
  • Any questions on vocab from chapter 1 (See Wordle diagram below)
  • Written response on "Experimental Design from Start to Finish"
Students began work on the Design Your Own Measuring Device activity:
  • Introduce procedure (All measures must have 1 estimated digit and a unit included)
  • Partners
  • Discuss
Extra time? Mini vocab review game from chapter 1 (See Wordle diagram below):
  • left side of room vs. right
  • Project Wordle diagram on dry erase board (ctrl+alt+apple+8)
  • Take turns trying to correctly explain a word of your choice. You may confer with your team before answering and each correct response is worth 1 point. If I decide your response is incorrect or incomplete, the opposing team will have a chance to steal the question for 1 point. Game duration depends on how much time we have.
Homework: Review for Scientific Method Quiz tomorrow!

September 9, Friday
Quote of the Day: "It is a good thing to learn caution from the misfortunes of others." - Publilius Syrus
Collected experimental data sheets and lab safety contracts
I introduced and students performed the "Intro to Data Colection" Lab
Safety for this lab:
  1. Keep computer far from beakers of hot and cold water
  2. Follow lab and teacher instructions carefully
Homework: Answer lab questions
Scientific Method Quiz Tuesday, September 13
SciMethodWordle.png


September 8, Thursday
Quote of the Day: "No amount of experimentation can ever prove me right; a single experiment can prove me wrong." - Einstein
Next Time Post:
The independent variable answers the question "What do I manipulate (change)?"
The dependent variable answers the question "What do I observe?"
The controlled variable answers the question "What do I keep the same?"

Viewed lab safety video (15:00). Collected quiz sheet at the end.
Complete work on the reaction time lab:
  • Discuss why, if any, unreliable data were omited.
  • Share overall reaction time experimental data results and how they were calculated.
  • 23 females had an average reaction time of 0.3543 seconds and 35 males had an average reaction time of 0.3399 seconds
  • Analyze / Discuss graph sheet of the data and how to label it (if necessary). Discuss possible data trends or lack thereof.
  • Explain how to complete the "experiment" and "conclusion" sections of lab sheet for full credit.
    • "Experiment / Procedure" section should be a detailed, step-by-step description of the steps used to test the hypothesis. While reading yours, I will ask myself, "Could a random stranger follow these directions to repeat the process?"
    • "Conclusions" section should explain the data and logical reasoning as to why the data either supports or rejects the hypothesis being tested.
Homework: Completed reaction time lab and signed safety contract

S11.A.2.1.3 Use data to make inferences and predictions, or to draw conclusions, demonstrating understanding of experimental limits.
S11.A.2.1.4 Critique the results and conclusions of scientific inquiry for consistency and logic.
S11.A.2.1.5 Communicate results of investigations using multiple representations.
S11.A.2.2.2 Explain how technology (e.g., GPS, spectroscope, scanning electron microscope, pH meter, probe, interface, imaging technology, telescope) is used to extend human abilities and precision.

Sept 7, Wednesday: Periods 1-3 are 22 min.
Quote of the Day: "It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data." - Arthur Conan Doyle
Discuss Reaction time experiment :
  • Question: Does gender have an effect on reaction time?
  • Record question and hypothesis (worded as a testable prediction) on worksheet or blank paper.
  • Use Internet browser SAFARI or Chrome anytime we use a Gizmo
  • Conduct experiment (I will lead groups to the correct website and on how to login)
  • Record relevant data on your paper: group, your average reaction time, standard deviation, and number of extraneous clicks (If you have a standard deviation greater than 0.1 seconds and/or 2+ extra mouse clicks, please REDO THE EXPERIMENT until you do not!).
  • On (Shared Google Doc) OR my computer up front, enter: group you belong to, average reaction time, standard deviation and number of extraneous clicks
  • COLLECT DATA FOR ALL CLASSES
  • Evaluate our class data. Discuss initial thoughts, conclusions, etc.
S11.A.1.1.3 Evaluate the appropriateness of research questions (e.g., testable vs. not-testable).
S11.A.2.1.1 Critique the elements of an experimental design (e.g., raising questions, formulating hypotheses, developing procedures, identifying variables, manipulating variables, interpreting data, and drawing conclusions) applicable to a specific experimental design.
S11.A.2.1.2 Critique the elements of the design process (e.g. identify the problem, understand criteria, create solutions, select solution, test/evaluate, communicate results) applicable to a specific technological design.

In order to facilitate Discussion Forum, setup wikispaces accounts:
  • Go to wikispaces.com
  • Create a new account username: YourLastName2011 password: ? (But make sure you write it down!)
  • You DO NOT need to create your own wiki
  • You DO need to go to nahsphysicalscience.wikispaces.com and click "Join" and "Request Membership"
  • Once I approve your membership, you will then be able to respond to the first discussion

Sept 6, Tuesday: Periods 1-3 are 22 min. (8th period freshman assembly. Please escort your classes to the auditorium.)
Computer Use Rules: Handle Carefully, Plug Back in to Correct Spot
Attempt login on all laptops (If you have a problem with one, first ask a neighbor to attempt login, then notify me if there is still an issue)
Introduce explorelearning.com website and login procedure (username password # assigned based on seat)
Introduce reaction time experiment and discuss possible variables to test tomorrow
Extra time? Develop a controlled procedure to compare the reaction time of a thermometer to a stainless steel temperature probe.

September 2, Friday
Have a calculator handy in class today.
Quote of the Day: "Patience, persistence, and perspiration make an unbeatable combination for success." - Napoleon Hill
Checked homework (signed syllabus). Handed out textbooks and completed textbook sheet. Covered CH 1 Notes. Streaming vid: "How Scientists Work" (20:00)
Homework: Take your textbooks home and leave them there until June!

September 1, Thursday (Periods 1-3 are 22 min.) Begin Weekly Discussion Responses even earlier next time?
Quote of the Day: "A short saying often contains much wisdom." - Sophocles
Attendance, Welcome, and Fire Exit Procedure
.....I've been thinking recently....
  • How many of you love to get stuff for free!?
  • What would you say if I offered each of you a few thousand dollars for free!?
  • How many of you seriously think summer was WAY TOO short and don't think we should be back to work/school already?
  • How much $ do you think NASD spends per student each year?
  • Our district website. (Please pay particular attention to the final figure at the bottom)
  • I'm going to try my best to give you your money's worth!
Covered course syllabus and expectations.
Homework: Get syllabus signed for tomorrow. (10 points)
Interview and introduce a neighbor / Cover course syllabus and expectations:
  1. Meet your neighbor
  2. Find out about his or her interests, summer vacation, future plans, expectations for this course, etc.
  3. Introduce him or her briefly (30-60 sec.), tell us what you learned, and give us one piece of info from the syllabus or one class rule
  4. Class Websitex